Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants.
Arch Dis Child. 2005 Oct; 90(10):1033-8.AD

Abstract

AIMS

To compare iron fortified follow-on milk (iron follow-on), iron fortified partially modified cows' milk (iron milk), and iron medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in hospitalised infants.

METHODS

In a randomised controlled trial, infants aged 9-23 months with IDA and who were hospitalised with an acute illness received iron follow-on (12 mg/l ferrous iron), iron milk (12.9 mg/l ferrous iron), or iron medicine (ferrous gluconate at 3 mg/kg of elemental iron once daily). All interventions were given for three months. Changes in measures of iron status three months after hospital discharge were determined.

RESULTS

A total of 234 infants were randomised. Iron status was measured at follow up in 59 (70%) iron medicine, 49 (66%) iron follow-on, and 54 (70%) iron milk treated infants. There was a significant (mean, 95% CI) increase in haemoglobin (15 g/l, 13 to 16) and iron saturation (9%, 8 to 10) and decrease in ferritin (-53 microg/l, -74 to -31) in all three groups. Mean cell volume increased in iron follow-on (2 fl, 1 to 3) and iron milk (1 fl, 0.1 to 3) treated infants, but not in the iron medicine group (1 fl, -1 to 2). The proportion with IDA decreased in all three groups: iron medicine 93% to 7%, iron follow-on 83% to 8%, and iron milk 96% to 30%. Adverse effects, primarily gastrointestinal, occurred in 23% of the iron medicine, 14% of the iron follow-on, and 13% of the iron milk group.

CONCLUSIONS

Iron fortified follow-on milk, iron fortified partially modified cows' milk, and iron medicine all effectively treat IDA in infancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Massey University, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15956047

Citation

Wall, C R., et al. "Milk Versus Medicine for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Hospitalised Infants." Archives of Disease in Childhood, vol. 90, no. 10, 2005, pp. 1033-8.
Wall CR, Grant CC, Taua N, et al. Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants. Arch Dis Child. 2005;90(10):1033-8.
Wall, C. R., Grant, C. C., Taua, N., Wilson, C., & Thompson, J. M. (2005). Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 90(10), 1033-8.
Wall CR, et al. Milk Versus Medicine for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anaemia in Hospitalised Infants. Arch Dis Child. 2005;90(10):1033-8. PubMed PMID: 15956047.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Milk versus medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in hospitalised infants. AU - Wall,C R, AU - Grant,C C, AU - Taua,N, AU - Wilson,C, AU - Thompson,J M D, Y1 - 2005/06/14/ PY - 2005/6/16/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/6/16/entrez SP - 1033 EP - 8 JF - Archives of disease in childhood JO - Arch Dis Child VL - 90 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: To compare iron fortified follow-on milk (iron follow-on), iron fortified partially modified cows' milk (iron milk), and iron medicine for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in hospitalised infants. METHODS: In a randomised controlled trial, infants aged 9-23 months with IDA and who were hospitalised with an acute illness received iron follow-on (12 mg/l ferrous iron), iron milk (12.9 mg/l ferrous iron), or iron medicine (ferrous gluconate at 3 mg/kg of elemental iron once daily). All interventions were given for three months. Changes in measures of iron status three months after hospital discharge were determined. RESULTS: A total of 234 infants were randomised. Iron status was measured at follow up in 59 (70%) iron medicine, 49 (66%) iron follow-on, and 54 (70%) iron milk treated infants. There was a significant (mean, 95% CI) increase in haemoglobin (15 g/l, 13 to 16) and iron saturation (9%, 8 to 10) and decrease in ferritin (-53 microg/l, -74 to -31) in all three groups. Mean cell volume increased in iron follow-on (2 fl, 1 to 3) and iron milk (1 fl, 0.1 to 3) treated infants, but not in the iron medicine group (1 fl, -1 to 2). The proportion with IDA decreased in all three groups: iron medicine 93% to 7%, iron follow-on 83% to 8%, and iron milk 96% to 30%. Adverse effects, primarily gastrointestinal, occurred in 23% of the iron medicine, 14% of the iron follow-on, and 13% of the iron milk group. CONCLUSIONS: Iron fortified follow-on milk, iron fortified partially modified cows' milk, and iron medicine all effectively treat IDA in infancy. SN - 1468-2044 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15956047/Milk_versus_medicine_for_the_treatment_of_iron_deficiency_anaemia_in_hospitalised_infants_ L2 - https://adc.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15956047 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -