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Metabolic and ventilatory acclimatization to cold stress in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2005 Jul-Aug; 78(4):579-89.PB

Abstract

Passerines that overwinter in temperate climates undergo seasonal acclimatization that is characterized by metabolic adjustments that may include increased basal metabolic rate (BMR) and cold-induced summit metabolism (M(sum)) in winter relative to summer. Metabolic changes must be supported by equivalent changes in oxygen transport. While much is known about the morphology of the avian respiratory system, little is known about respiratory function under extreme cold stress. We examined seasonal variation in BMR, M(sum), and ventilation in seasonally acclimatized house sparrows from Wisconsin. BMR and M(sum) increased significantly in winter compared with summer. In winter, BMR increased 64%, and M(sum) increased 29% over summer values. The 64% increase in winter BMR is the highest recorded for birds. Metabolic expansibility (M(sum)/BMR) was 9.0 in summer and 6.9 in winter birds. The metabolic expansibility of 9.0 in summer is the highest yet recorded for birds. Ventilatory accommodation under helox cold stress was due to changes in breathing frequency (f), tidal volume, and oxygen extraction efficiency in both seasons. However, the only significant difference between summer and winter ventilation measures in helox cold stress was f. Mean f in helox cold stress for winter birds was 1.23 times summer values.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology and Microbiology, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI 54901-8640, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15957112

Citation

Arens, Jeremy R., and Sheldon J. Cooper. "Metabolic and Ventilatory Acclimatization to Cold Stress in House Sparrows (Passer Domesticus)." Physiological and Biochemical Zoology : PBZ, vol. 78, no. 4, 2005, pp. 579-89.
Arens JR, Cooper SJ. Metabolic and ventilatory acclimatization to cold stress in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Physiol Biochem Zool. 2005;78(4):579-89.
Arens, J. R., & Cooper, S. J. (2005). Metabolic and ventilatory acclimatization to cold stress in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Physiological and Biochemical Zoology : PBZ, 78(4), 579-89.
Arens JR, Cooper SJ. Metabolic and Ventilatory Acclimatization to Cold Stress in House Sparrows (Passer Domesticus). Physiol Biochem Zool. 2005 Jul-Aug;78(4):579-89. PubMed PMID: 15957112.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic and ventilatory acclimatization to cold stress in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). AU - Arens,Jeremy R, AU - Cooper,Sheldon J, Y1 - 2005/05/18/ PY - 2004/09/07/accepted PY - 2005/6/16/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/6/16/entrez SP - 579 EP - 89 JF - Physiological and biochemical zoology : PBZ JO - Physiol Biochem Zool VL - 78 IS - 4 N2 - Passerines that overwinter in temperate climates undergo seasonal acclimatization that is characterized by metabolic adjustments that may include increased basal metabolic rate (BMR) and cold-induced summit metabolism (M(sum)) in winter relative to summer. Metabolic changes must be supported by equivalent changes in oxygen transport. While much is known about the morphology of the avian respiratory system, little is known about respiratory function under extreme cold stress. We examined seasonal variation in BMR, M(sum), and ventilation in seasonally acclimatized house sparrows from Wisconsin. BMR and M(sum) increased significantly in winter compared with summer. In winter, BMR increased 64%, and M(sum) increased 29% over summer values. The 64% increase in winter BMR is the highest recorded for birds. Metabolic expansibility (M(sum)/BMR) was 9.0 in summer and 6.9 in winter birds. The metabolic expansibility of 9.0 in summer is the highest yet recorded for birds. Ventilatory accommodation under helox cold stress was due to changes in breathing frequency (f), tidal volume, and oxygen extraction efficiency in both seasons. However, the only significant difference between summer and winter ventilation measures in helox cold stress was f. Mean f in helox cold stress for winter birds was 1.23 times summer values. SN - 1522-2152 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15957112/Metabolic_and_ventilatory_acclimatization_to_cold_stress_in_house_sparrows__Passer_domesticus__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1086/430235 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -