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Ankle-brachial index and subclinical cardiac and carotid disease: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.
Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Jul 01; 162(1):33-41.AJ

Abstract

The authors studied associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and subclinical atherosclerosis in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants included 3,458 women (average age = 62.6 years) and 3,112 men (average age = 62.8 years) who were free of clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Measurements included ABI, carotid artery intima-media thickness, and coronary artery calcium assessed with computed tomography. Five ABI categories were defined: <0.90 (definite peripheral arterial disease (PAD)), 0.90-0.99 (borderline ABI), 1.00-1.09 (low-normal ABI), 1.10-1.29 (normal ABI), and > or =1.30 (high ABI). Compared with that in men with normal ABI, significantly higher internal carotid artery intima-media thickness was observed in men with definite PAD (1.58 vs. 1.09; p < 0.001), borderline ABI (1.33 vs. 1.09; p < 0.001), and low-normal ABI (1.18 vs. 1.09; p < 0.001) after adjustment for confounders. Fully adjusted odds ratios for a coronary artery calcium score greater than 20 decreased across progressively higher ABI categories in both women (2.85 (definite PAD), 1.27 (borderline ABI), 1.11 (low-normal ABI), 1.00 (normal ABI; referent), and 0.78 (high ABI); p for trend = 0.0002) and men (3.26 (definite PAD), 1.72 (borderline ABI), 1.14 (low-normal ABI), 1.00 (normal ABI; referent), and 1.43 (high ABI); p for trend = 0.0002). These findings indicate excess coronary and carotid atherosclerosis at ABI values below 1.10 (men) and 1.00 (women) and may imply increased risk of cardiovascular events in persons with borderline and low-normal ABI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. mdm608@northwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15961584

Citation

McDermott, Mary McGrae, et al. "Ankle-brachial Index and Subclinical Cardiac and Carotid Disease: the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 162, no. 1, 2005, pp. 33-41.
McDermott MM, Liu K, Criqui MH, et al. Ankle-brachial index and subclinical cardiac and carotid disease: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. Am J Epidemiol. 2005;162(1):33-41.
McDermott, M. M., Liu, K., Criqui, M. H., Ruth, K., Goff, D., Saad, M. F., Wu, C., Homma, S., & Sharrett, A. R. (2005). Ankle-brachial index and subclinical cardiac and carotid disease: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. American Journal of Epidemiology, 162(1), 33-41.
McDermott MM, et al. Ankle-brachial Index and Subclinical Cardiac and Carotid Disease: the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Jul 1;162(1):33-41. PubMed PMID: 15961584.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ankle-brachial index and subclinical cardiac and carotid disease: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. AU - McDermott,Mary McGrae, AU - Liu,Kiang, AU - Criqui,Michael H, AU - Ruth,Karen, AU - Goff,David, AU - Saad,Mohammed F, AU - Wu,Colin, AU - Homma,Shunichi, AU - Sharrett,A Richey, PY - 2005/6/18/pubmed PY - 2005/8/5/medline PY - 2005/6/18/entrez SP - 33 EP - 41 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am J Epidemiol VL - 162 IS - 1 N2 - The authors studied associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and subclinical atherosclerosis in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants included 3,458 women (average age = 62.6 years) and 3,112 men (average age = 62.8 years) who were free of clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Measurements included ABI, carotid artery intima-media thickness, and coronary artery calcium assessed with computed tomography. Five ABI categories were defined: <0.90 (definite peripheral arterial disease (PAD)), 0.90-0.99 (borderline ABI), 1.00-1.09 (low-normal ABI), 1.10-1.29 (normal ABI), and > or =1.30 (high ABI). Compared with that in men with normal ABI, significantly higher internal carotid artery intima-media thickness was observed in men with definite PAD (1.58 vs. 1.09; p < 0.001), borderline ABI (1.33 vs. 1.09; p < 0.001), and low-normal ABI (1.18 vs. 1.09; p < 0.001) after adjustment for confounders. Fully adjusted odds ratios for a coronary artery calcium score greater than 20 decreased across progressively higher ABI categories in both women (2.85 (definite PAD), 1.27 (borderline ABI), 1.11 (low-normal ABI), 1.00 (normal ABI; referent), and 0.78 (high ABI); p for trend = 0.0002) and men (3.26 (definite PAD), 1.72 (borderline ABI), 1.14 (low-normal ABI), 1.00 (normal ABI; referent), and 1.43 (high ABI); p for trend = 0.0002). These findings indicate excess coronary and carotid atherosclerosis at ABI values below 1.10 (men) and 1.00 (women) and may imply increased risk of cardiovascular events in persons with borderline and low-normal ABI. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15961584/Ankle_brachial_index_and_subclinical_cardiac_and_carotid_disease:_the_multi_ethnic_study_of_atherosclerosis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwi167 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -