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Secondary evolutionary escalation between brachiopods and enemies of other prey.
Science. 2005 Jun 17; 308(5729):1774-7.Sci

Abstract

The fossil record of predation indicates that attacks on Paleozoic brachiopods were very rare, especially compared to those on post-Paleozoic mollusks, yet stratigraphically and geographically widespread. Drilling frequencies were very low in the early Paleozoic (<<1%) and went up slightly in the mid-to-late Paleozoic. Present-day brachiopods revealed frequencies only slightly higher. The persistent rarity of drilling suggests that brachiopods were the secondary casualties of mistaken or opportunistic attacks by the enemies of other taxa. Such sporadic attacks became slightly more frequent as trophic systems escalated and predators diversified. Some evolutionarily persistent biotic interactions may be incidental rather than coevolutionary or escalatory in nature.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geosciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA. michalk@vt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15961667

Citation

Kowalewski, Michal, et al. "Secondary Evolutionary Escalation Between Brachiopods and Enemies of Other Prey." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 308, no. 5729, 2005, pp. 1774-7.
Kowalewski M, Hoffmeister AP, Baumiller TK, et al. Secondary evolutionary escalation between brachiopods and enemies of other prey. Science. 2005;308(5729):1774-7.
Kowalewski, M., Hoffmeister, A. P., Baumiller, T. K., & Bambach, R. K. (2005). Secondary evolutionary escalation between brachiopods and enemies of other prey. Science (New York, N.Y.), 308(5729), 1774-7.
Kowalewski M, et al. Secondary Evolutionary Escalation Between Brachiopods and Enemies of Other Prey. Science. 2005 Jun 17;308(5729):1774-7. PubMed PMID: 15961667.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Secondary evolutionary escalation between brachiopods and enemies of other prey. AU - Kowalewski,Michal, AU - Hoffmeister,Alan P, AU - Baumiller,Tomasz K, AU - Bambach,Richard K, PY - 2005/6/18/pubmed PY - 2005/7/1/medline PY - 2005/6/18/entrez SP - 1774 EP - 7 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 308 IS - 5729 N2 - The fossil record of predation indicates that attacks on Paleozoic brachiopods were very rare, especially compared to those on post-Paleozoic mollusks, yet stratigraphically and geographically widespread. Drilling frequencies were very low in the early Paleozoic (<<1%) and went up slightly in the mid-to-late Paleozoic. Present-day brachiopods revealed frequencies only slightly higher. The persistent rarity of drilling suggests that brachiopods were the secondary casualties of mistaken or opportunistic attacks by the enemies of other taxa. Such sporadic attacks became slightly more frequent as trophic systems escalated and predators diversified. Some evolutionarily persistent biotic interactions may be incidental rather than coevolutionary or escalatory in nature. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15961667/Secondary_evolutionary_escalation_between_brachiopods_and_enemies_of_other_prey_ L2 - https://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=15961667 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -