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Infant feeding practices before implementing alternatives to prolonged breastfeeding to reduce HIV transmission through breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire.
J Trop Pediatr. 2005 Dec; 51(6):351-5.JT

Abstract

The aim of this study was to describe baseline infant feeding practices in women of unknown HIV status in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, before the implementation of infant feeding interventions aimed at the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV through breastmilk. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in March 2000 among 225 mothers attending community-run health facilities with their own child for either immunization or weighting. All but two children had ever been breastfed, of whom 94 per cent were still being breastfed at 6 months of age. Exclusive breastfeeding was not practiced in this population since all women had given water to their child, starting in median one day after birth. Moreover, 20 per cent of the mothers had introduced infant formula in median three weeks after delivery. This study provides useful information for planning purposes in this urban African population, where exclusive breastfeeding is rare and the use of infant formula relatively common.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité INSERM 593, Institut de Santé Publique Epidémiologie Développement, Université Victor Segalen, Bordeaux, France. Renaud.Becquet@isped.u-bordeaux2.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15967771

Citation

Becquet, Renaud, et al. "Infant Feeding Practices Before Implementing Alternatives to Prolonged Breastfeeding to Reduce HIV Transmission Through Breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire." Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, vol. 51, no. 6, 2005, pp. 351-5.
Becquet R, Castetbon K, Viho I, et al. Infant feeding practices before implementing alternatives to prolonged breastfeeding to reduce HIV transmission through breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. J Trop Pediatr. 2005;51(6):351-5.
Becquet, R., Castetbon, K., Viho, I., Ekouevi, D. K., Béquet, L., Ehouo, B., Dabis, F., & Leroy, V. (2005). Infant feeding practices before implementing alternatives to prolonged breastfeeding to reduce HIV transmission through breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, 51(6), 351-5.
Becquet R, et al. Infant Feeding Practices Before Implementing Alternatives to Prolonged Breastfeeding to Reduce HIV Transmission Through Breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire. J Trop Pediatr. 2005;51(6):351-5. PubMed PMID: 15967771.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant feeding practices before implementing alternatives to prolonged breastfeeding to reduce HIV transmission through breastmilk in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. AU - Becquet,Renaud, AU - Castetbon,Katia, AU - Viho,Ida, AU - Ekouevi,Didier K, AU - Béquet,Laurence, AU - Ehouo,Brigitte, AU - Dabis,François, AU - Leroy,Valériane, AU - ,, Y1 - 2005/06/20/ PY - 2005/6/22/pubmed PY - 2006/2/4/medline PY - 2005/6/22/entrez SP - 351 EP - 5 JF - Journal of tropical pediatrics JO - J. Trop. Pediatr. VL - 51 IS - 6 N2 - The aim of this study was to describe baseline infant feeding practices in women of unknown HIV status in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, before the implementation of infant feeding interventions aimed at the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV through breastmilk. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in March 2000 among 225 mothers attending community-run health facilities with their own child for either immunization or weighting. All but two children had ever been breastfed, of whom 94 per cent were still being breastfed at 6 months of age. Exclusive breastfeeding was not practiced in this population since all women had given water to their child, starting in median one day after birth. Moreover, 20 per cent of the mothers had introduced infant formula in median three weeks after delivery. This study provides useful information for planning purposes in this urban African population, where exclusive breastfeeding is rare and the use of infant formula relatively common. SN - 0142-6338 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15967771/Infant_feeding_practices_before_implementing_alternatives_to_prolonged_breastfeeding_to_reduce_HIV_transmission_through_breastmilk_in_Abidjan_Cote_d'Ivoire_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/tropej/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/tropej/fmi050 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -