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Supplementation of zinc from organic or inorganic source improves performance and antioxidant status of heat-distressed quail.
Poult Sci. 2005 Jun; 84(6):882-7.PS

Abstract

Two sources of zinc [ZnSO4.H2O or ZnPicolinate (ZnPic)] supplementation were evaluated for their effects on performance, carcass weight, levels of malondialdehyde, and vitamins C, E, A in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix Japonica) exposed to high ambient temperature of 34 degrees C. The birds (n = 360; 10-d-old) were randomly assigned to 12 treatment groups consisting of 3 replicates of 10 birds each in a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments (temperatures, zinc sources, zinc levels). Birds were kept in wire cages in a temperature-controlled room at either 22 degrees C (thermoneutral) or 34 degrees C (heat stress) for 8 h/d (0900 to 1700 h) until the end of study, and fed a basal (control) diet or the basal diet supplemented with either 30 or 60 mg of Zn as ZnSO4 H2O or ZnPic/kg of diet. Heat exposure decreased (P = 0.001) live weight gain, feed intake, feed efficiency, and carcass weight when the basal diet was fed. A linear increase in feed intake (P = 0.01) and BW (P = 0.01), and improvement in feed efficiency (P = 0.01) and carcass weight (P < or = 0.05) were found in zinc-supplemented quail reared under heat-stress conditions. Serum vitamin C (P = 0.04), E (P = 0.05), and cholesterol (P = 0.01) concentrations increased linearly, whereas malondialdehyde concentrations decreased linearly (P = 0.02) as dietary zinc sulfate and ZnPic supplementation increased. An interaction between dietary zinc sources, temperature, and levels of supplementation (P < or = 0.05) for these parameters was detected. Serum vitamins C, E, and A concentrations were not different in supplemented birds reared at thermoneutral temperature. Supplementation with zinc improved carcass weight and antioxidant status of birds, and the effects of ZnPic were relatively greater than those of ZnSO4.H2O in heat-stressed quail. Results of the present study suggest that supplementation with ZnPic could be considered to be more protective than ZnSO4.H2O by reducing the negative effects of oxidative stress induced by heat stress in quail.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Tennessee, 2640 Morgan Circle, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-4588, USA. ksahin@firat.edu.trNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15971524

Citation

Sahin, K, et al. "Supplementation of Zinc From Organic or Inorganic Source Improves Performance and Antioxidant Status of Heat-distressed Quail." Poultry Science, vol. 84, no. 6, 2005, pp. 882-7.
Sahin K, Smith MO, Onderci M, et al. Supplementation of zinc from organic or inorganic source improves performance and antioxidant status of heat-distressed quail. Poult Sci. 2005;84(6):882-7.
Sahin, K., Smith, M. O., Onderci, M., Sahin, N., Gursu, M. F., & Kucuk, O. (2005). Supplementation of zinc from organic or inorganic source improves performance and antioxidant status of heat-distressed quail. Poultry Science, 84(6), 882-7.
Sahin K, et al. Supplementation of Zinc From Organic or Inorganic Source Improves Performance and Antioxidant Status of Heat-distressed Quail. Poult Sci. 2005;84(6):882-7. PubMed PMID: 15971524.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Supplementation of zinc from organic or inorganic source improves performance and antioxidant status of heat-distressed quail. AU - Sahin,K, AU - Smith,M O, AU - Onderci,M, AU - Sahin,N, AU - Gursu,M F, AU - Kucuk,O, PY - 2005/6/24/pubmed PY - 2005/8/3/medline PY - 2005/6/24/entrez SP - 882 EP - 7 JF - Poultry science JO - Poult. Sci. VL - 84 IS - 6 N2 - Two sources of zinc [ZnSO4.H2O or ZnPicolinate (ZnPic)] supplementation were evaluated for their effects on performance, carcass weight, levels of malondialdehyde, and vitamins C, E, A in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix Japonica) exposed to high ambient temperature of 34 degrees C. The birds (n = 360; 10-d-old) were randomly assigned to 12 treatment groups consisting of 3 replicates of 10 birds each in a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments (temperatures, zinc sources, zinc levels). Birds were kept in wire cages in a temperature-controlled room at either 22 degrees C (thermoneutral) or 34 degrees C (heat stress) for 8 h/d (0900 to 1700 h) until the end of study, and fed a basal (control) diet or the basal diet supplemented with either 30 or 60 mg of Zn as ZnSO4 H2O or ZnPic/kg of diet. Heat exposure decreased (P = 0.001) live weight gain, feed intake, feed efficiency, and carcass weight when the basal diet was fed. A linear increase in feed intake (P = 0.01) and BW (P = 0.01), and improvement in feed efficiency (P = 0.01) and carcass weight (P < or = 0.05) were found in zinc-supplemented quail reared under heat-stress conditions. Serum vitamin C (P = 0.04), E (P = 0.05), and cholesterol (P = 0.01) concentrations increased linearly, whereas malondialdehyde concentrations decreased linearly (P = 0.02) as dietary zinc sulfate and ZnPic supplementation increased. An interaction between dietary zinc sources, temperature, and levels of supplementation (P < or = 0.05) for these parameters was detected. Serum vitamins C, E, and A concentrations were not different in supplemented birds reared at thermoneutral temperature. Supplementation with zinc improved carcass weight and antioxidant status of birds, and the effects of ZnPic were relatively greater than those of ZnSO4.H2O in heat-stressed quail. Results of the present study suggest that supplementation with ZnPic could be considered to be more protective than ZnSO4.H2O by reducing the negative effects of oxidative stress induced by heat stress in quail. SN - 0032-5791 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15971524/Supplementation_of_zinc_from_organic_or_inorganic_source_improves_performance_and_antioxidant_status_of_heat_distressed_quail_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ps/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ps/84.6.882 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -