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The association of birthweight and contemporary size with insulin resistance among children from Estonia and Denmark: findings from the European Youth Heart Study.
Diabet Med. 2005 Jul; 22(7):921-30.DM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the associations of birthweight, contemporary body mass index and height with insulin resistance in children.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

PARTICIPANTS

From Estonia (n = 1174) and Denmark (n = 1018), 2192 school children aged 9 and 15 years were randomly selected.

MAIN OUTCOMES

Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment), triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure.

RESULTS

There was an inverse association between birthweight and insulin resistance and a positive association between contemporary body mass index and insulin resistance. With adjustment for maternal and paternal educational level, income, smoking and body mass index, an increase of one unit of sex, age and country standardized body mass index z-score was associated with a 5% (95% CI: 2, 7%) increase in homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) score and a one-unit z-score increase in birthweight with a 2% (95% CI: 0, 5%) decrease in HOMA score. In the 9-year-old age group, height was positively associated with insulin resistance [for a one-unit increase in height z-score HOMA score increased by 30% (95% CI: 14, 50%)], but in the 15-year-old age group there was no association between height and insulin resistance (4% (95% CI: -5, 14%), P for interaction with age group = 0.001). For both ages, those in the lowest third of the birthweight distribution and highest third of the body mass index distribution were most insulin resistant and, among 9-year olds, those in the lowest third of the birthweight distribution and highest third of the height distribution were most insulin resistant. Birthweight was only inversely associated with systolic blood pressure when adjustment was made for either contemporary body mass index or height and there was no association between birthweight and high-density lipoprotein or triglyceride concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS

Taken together, these results suggest that a slow intrauterine growth trajectory and/or a fast post-natal growth trajectory is associated with greater insulin resistance in childhood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, UK. d.a.lawlor@bristol.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15975109

Citation

Lawlor, D A., et al. "The Association of Birthweight and Contemporary Size With Insulin Resistance Among Children From Estonia and Denmark: Findings From the European Youth Heart Study." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 22, no. 7, 2005, pp. 921-30.
Lawlor DA, Riddoch CJ, Page AS, et al. The association of birthweight and contemporary size with insulin resistance among children from Estonia and Denmark: findings from the European Youth Heart Study. Diabet Med. 2005;22(7):921-30.
Lawlor, D. A., Riddoch, C. J., Page, A. S., Anderssen, S. A., Froberg, K., Harro, M., Stansbie, D., & Smith, G. D. (2005). The association of birthweight and contemporary size with insulin resistance among children from Estonia and Denmark: findings from the European Youth Heart Study. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 22(7), 921-30.
Lawlor DA, et al. The Association of Birthweight and Contemporary Size With Insulin Resistance Among Children From Estonia and Denmark: Findings From the European Youth Heart Study. Diabet Med. 2005;22(7):921-30. PubMed PMID: 15975109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of birthweight and contemporary size with insulin resistance among children from Estonia and Denmark: findings from the European Youth Heart Study. AU - Lawlor,D A, AU - Riddoch,C J, AU - Page,A S, AU - Anderssen,S A, AU - Froberg,K, AU - Harro,M, AU - Stansbie,D, AU - Smith,G Davey, PY - 2005/6/25/pubmed PY - 2005/9/24/medline PY - 2005/6/25/entrez SP - 921 EP - 30 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet. Med. VL - 22 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations of birthweight, contemporary body mass index and height with insulin resistance in children. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: From Estonia (n = 1174) and Denmark (n = 1018), 2192 school children aged 9 and 15 years were randomly selected. MAIN OUTCOMES: Insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment), triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS: There was an inverse association between birthweight and insulin resistance and a positive association between contemporary body mass index and insulin resistance. With adjustment for maternal and paternal educational level, income, smoking and body mass index, an increase of one unit of sex, age and country standardized body mass index z-score was associated with a 5% (95% CI: 2, 7%) increase in homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) score and a one-unit z-score increase in birthweight with a 2% (95% CI: 0, 5%) decrease in HOMA score. In the 9-year-old age group, height was positively associated with insulin resistance [for a one-unit increase in height z-score HOMA score increased by 30% (95% CI: 14, 50%)], but in the 15-year-old age group there was no association between height and insulin resistance (4% (95% CI: -5, 14%), P for interaction with age group = 0.001). For both ages, those in the lowest third of the birthweight distribution and highest third of the body mass index distribution were most insulin resistant and, among 9-year olds, those in the lowest third of the birthweight distribution and highest third of the height distribution were most insulin resistant. Birthweight was only inversely associated with systolic blood pressure when adjustment was made for either contemporary body mass index or height and there was no association between birthweight and high-density lipoprotein or triglyceride concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results suggest that a slow intrauterine growth trajectory and/or a fast post-natal growth trajectory is associated with greater insulin resistance in childhood. SN - 0742-3071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15975109/The_association_of_birthweight_and_contemporary_size_with_insulin_resistance_among_children_from_Estonia_and_Denmark:_findings_from_the_European_Youth_Heart_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2005.01551.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -