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Acute effects of meal fatty acids on postprandial NEFA, glucose and apo E response: implications for insulin sensitivity and lipoprotein regulation?
Br J Nutr 2005; 93(5):693-700BJ

Abstract

Our aim was to determine whether meal fatty acids influence insulin and glucose responses to mixed meals and whether these effects can be explained by variations in postprandial NEFA and Apo, which regulate the metabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins (Apo C and E). A single-blind crossover study examined the effects of single meals enriched in saturated fatty acids SFA), n-6 PUFA and MUFA on plasma metabolite and insulin responses. The triacylglycerol response following the PUFA meal showed a lower net incremental area under the curve than following the SFA and MUFA meals (P<0.007). Compared with the SFA meal, the PUFA meal showed a lower net incremental area under the curve for the NEFA response from initial suppression to the end of the postprandial period (180-480 min; P<0.02), and both PUFA and MUFA showed a lower net incremental glucose response (P<0.02), although insulin concentrations were similar between meals. The pattern of the Apo E response was also different following the SFA meal (P<0.02). There was a significant association between the net incremental NEFA (180-480 min) and glucose response (rs=0.409, P=0.025), and in multiple regression analysis the NEFA response accounted for 24 % of the variation in glucose response. Meal SFA have adverse effects on the postprandial glucose response that may be due to greater elevations in NEFA arising from differences in the metabolism of SFA- v. PUFA- and MUFA-rich lipoproteins. Elevated Apo E responses to high-SFA meals may have important implications for the hepatic metabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AP, UK. k.g.jackson@reading.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15975169

Citation

Jackson, Kim G., et al. "Acute Effects of Meal Fatty Acids On Postprandial NEFA, Glucose and Apo E Response: Implications for Insulin Sensitivity and Lipoprotein Regulation?" The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 93, no. 5, 2005, pp. 693-700.
Jackson KG, Wolstencroft EJ, Bateman PA, et al. Acute effects of meal fatty acids on postprandial NEFA, glucose and apo E response: implications for insulin sensitivity and lipoprotein regulation? Br J Nutr. 2005;93(5):693-700.
Jackson, K. G., Wolstencroft, E. J., Bateman, P. A., Yaqoob, P., & Williams, C. M. (2005). Acute effects of meal fatty acids on postprandial NEFA, glucose and apo E response: implications for insulin sensitivity and lipoprotein regulation? The British Journal of Nutrition, 93(5), pp. 693-700.
Jackson KG, et al. Acute Effects of Meal Fatty Acids On Postprandial NEFA, Glucose and Apo E Response: Implications for Insulin Sensitivity and Lipoprotein Regulation. Br J Nutr. 2005;93(5):693-700. PubMed PMID: 15975169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute effects of meal fatty acids on postprandial NEFA, glucose and apo E response: implications for insulin sensitivity and lipoprotein regulation? AU - Jackson,Kim G, AU - Wolstencroft,Emma J, AU - Bateman,Paul A, AU - Yaqoob,Parveen, AU - Williams,Christine M, PY - 2005/6/25/pubmed PY - 2005/9/15/medline PY - 2005/6/25/entrez SP - 693 EP - 700 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 93 IS - 5 N2 - Our aim was to determine whether meal fatty acids influence insulin and glucose responses to mixed meals and whether these effects can be explained by variations in postprandial NEFA and Apo, which regulate the metabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins (Apo C and E). A single-blind crossover study examined the effects of single meals enriched in saturated fatty acids SFA), n-6 PUFA and MUFA on plasma metabolite and insulin responses. The triacylglycerol response following the PUFA meal showed a lower net incremental area under the curve than following the SFA and MUFA meals (P<0.007). Compared with the SFA meal, the PUFA meal showed a lower net incremental area under the curve for the NEFA response from initial suppression to the end of the postprandial period (180-480 min; P<0.02), and both PUFA and MUFA showed a lower net incremental glucose response (P<0.02), although insulin concentrations were similar between meals. The pattern of the Apo E response was also different following the SFA meal (P<0.02). There was a significant association between the net incremental NEFA (180-480 min) and glucose response (rs=0.409, P=0.025), and in multiple regression analysis the NEFA response accounted for 24 % of the variation in glucose response. Meal SFA have adverse effects on the postprandial glucose response that may be due to greater elevations in NEFA arising from differences in the metabolism of SFA- v. PUFA- and MUFA-rich lipoproteins. Elevated Apo E responses to high-SFA meals may have important implications for the hepatic metabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15975169/Acute_effects_of_meal_fatty_acids_on_postprandial_NEFA_glucose_and_apo_E_response:_implications_for_insulin_sensitivity_and_lipoprotein_regulation L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114505001091/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -