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A lower ongoing pregnancy rate can be expected when GnRH agonist is used for triggering final oocyte maturation instead of HCG in patients undergoing IVF with GnRH antagonists.
Hum Reprod. 2005 Oct; 20(10):2887-92.HR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Eliciting an endogenous LH surge by GnRH-agonist for the induction of final oocyte maturation may be more physiological compared with the administration of HCG. However, the efficacy of this intervention in patients treated for IVF with GnRH antagonists remains to be assessed.

METHODS

106 patients were randomized to receive either 10 000 IU urinary HCG or 0.2 mg Triptorelin for triggering final oocyte maturation. Ovarian stimulation for IVF was performed with a fixed dose of 200 IU recombinant FSH and GnRH antagonist was started on stimulation day 6. Luteal phase was supported with micronized vaginal progesterone and oral estradiol. The study was monitored continuously for safety and stopping rules were established.

RESULTS

No significant differences were present in the number of cumulus-oocyte complexes retrieved, in the proportion of metaphase II oocytes, in fertilization rates or in the number and quality of the embryos transferred between the two groups. However, a significantly lower probability of ongoing pregnancy in the GnRH agonist arm prompted discontinuation of the trial, according to the stopping rules established (odds ratio 0.11; 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.52).

CONCLUSIONS

Lower probability of ongoing pregnancy can be expected when GnRH agonist is used for triggering final oocyte maturation instead of HCG in patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for IVF with GnRH antagonists.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre of Reproductive Medicine, Dutch-Speaking Brussels Free University, Belgium. stratis.kolibianakis@otenet.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15979994

Citation

Kolibianakis, E M., et al. "A Lower Ongoing Pregnancy Rate Can Be Expected when GnRH Agonist Is Used for Triggering Final Oocyte Maturation Instead of HCG in Patients Undergoing IVF With GnRH Antagonists." Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), vol. 20, no. 10, 2005, pp. 2887-92.
Kolibianakis EM, Schultze-Mosgau A, Schroer A, et al. A lower ongoing pregnancy rate can be expected when GnRH agonist is used for triggering final oocyte maturation instead of HCG in patients undergoing IVF with GnRH antagonists. Hum Reprod. 2005;20(10):2887-92.
Kolibianakis, E. M., Schultze-Mosgau, A., Schroer, A., van Steirteghem, A., Devroey, P., Diedrich, K., & Griesinger, G. (2005). A lower ongoing pregnancy rate can be expected when GnRH agonist is used for triggering final oocyte maturation instead of HCG in patients undergoing IVF with GnRH antagonists. Human Reproduction (Oxford, England), 20(10), 2887-92.
Kolibianakis EM, et al. A Lower Ongoing Pregnancy Rate Can Be Expected when GnRH Agonist Is Used for Triggering Final Oocyte Maturation Instead of HCG in Patients Undergoing IVF With GnRH Antagonists. Hum Reprod. 2005;20(10):2887-92. PubMed PMID: 15979994.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A lower ongoing pregnancy rate can be expected when GnRH agonist is used for triggering final oocyte maturation instead of HCG in patients undergoing IVF with GnRH antagonists. AU - Kolibianakis,E M, AU - Schultze-Mosgau,A, AU - Schroer,A, AU - van Steirteghem,A, AU - Devroey,P, AU - Diedrich,K, AU - Griesinger,G, Y1 - 2005/06/24/ PY - 2005/6/28/pubmed PY - 2006/1/28/medline PY - 2005/6/28/entrez SP - 2887 EP - 92 JF - Human reproduction (Oxford, England) JO - Hum. Reprod. VL - 20 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Eliciting an endogenous LH surge by GnRH-agonist for the induction of final oocyte maturation may be more physiological compared with the administration of HCG. However, the efficacy of this intervention in patients treated for IVF with GnRH antagonists remains to be assessed. METHODS: 106 patients were randomized to receive either 10 000 IU urinary HCG or 0.2 mg Triptorelin for triggering final oocyte maturation. Ovarian stimulation for IVF was performed with a fixed dose of 200 IU recombinant FSH and GnRH antagonist was started on stimulation day 6. Luteal phase was supported with micronized vaginal progesterone and oral estradiol. The study was monitored continuously for safety and stopping rules were established. RESULTS: No significant differences were present in the number of cumulus-oocyte complexes retrieved, in the proportion of metaphase II oocytes, in fertilization rates or in the number and quality of the embryos transferred between the two groups. However, a significantly lower probability of ongoing pregnancy in the GnRH agonist arm prompted discontinuation of the trial, according to the stopping rules established (odds ratio 0.11; 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Lower probability of ongoing pregnancy can be expected when GnRH agonist is used for triggering final oocyte maturation instead of HCG in patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for IVF with GnRH antagonists. SN - 0268-1161 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15979994/A_lower_ongoing_pregnancy_rate_can_be_expected_when_GnRH_agonist_is_used_for_triggering_final_oocyte_maturation_instead_of_HCG_in_patients_undergoing_IVF_with_GnRH_antagonists_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/humrep/dei150 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -