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Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2005; 92(1):11-7BC

Abstract

Soy and its constituents have been shown in many in vivo and in vitro studies and in some epidemiological studies to have anti-cancer effects. Some soy constituents, however, also stimulate cell proliferation, which has raised concerns in promoting soy intake among breast cancer survivors. To investigate whether soy intake may be associated with breast cancer survival, we evaluated data from a cohort of 1459 breast cancer patients who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study between 1996 and 1998. Usual soy food intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. The median follow-up time for this cohort of women was 5.2 years. We found that soy intake prior to cancer diagnosis was unrelated to disease-free breast cancer survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-1.33 for the highest tertile compared to the lowest tertile). The association between soy protein intake and breast cancer survival did not differ according to ER/PR status, tumor stage, age at diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), or menopausal status. Additionally, the soy-survival association did not appear to vary according to XbaI or PvuII polymorphisms in ER-alpha, or C(14206)T, G(25652)A, or A(50766)G polymorphisms in ER-beta. These data suggest that soyfoods do not have an adverse effect on breast cancer survival.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Center for Health Service Research, Vanderbilt University, Medical Center East, Suite 6000, Nashville, TN 37232-8300, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15980986

Citation

Boyapati, Sonia M., et al. "Soyfood Intake and Breast Cancer Survival: a Followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 92, no. 1, 2005, pp. 11-7.
Boyapati SM, Shu XO, Ruan ZX, et al. Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2005;92(1):11-7.
Boyapati, S. M., Shu, X. O., Ruan, Z. X., Dai, Q., Cai, Q., Gao, Y. T., & Zheng, W. (2005). Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 92(1), pp. 11-7.
Boyapati SM, et al. Soyfood Intake and Breast Cancer Survival: a Followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2005;92(1):11-7. PubMed PMID: 15980986.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a followup of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. AU - Boyapati,Sonia M, AU - Shu,Xiao-ou, AU - Ruan,Zhi Xian, AU - Dai,Qi, AU - Cai,Qiuyin, AU - Gao,Yu-tang, AU - Zheng,Wei, PY - 2005/6/28/pubmed PY - 2005/11/3/medline PY - 2005/6/28/entrez SP - 11 EP - 7 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. VL - 92 IS - 1 N2 - Soy and its constituents have been shown in many in vivo and in vitro studies and in some epidemiological studies to have anti-cancer effects. Some soy constituents, however, also stimulate cell proliferation, which has raised concerns in promoting soy intake among breast cancer survivors. To investigate whether soy intake may be associated with breast cancer survival, we evaluated data from a cohort of 1459 breast cancer patients who participated in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study between 1996 and 1998. Usual soy food intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. The median follow-up time for this cohort of women was 5.2 years. We found that soy intake prior to cancer diagnosis was unrelated to disease-free breast cancer survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-1.33 for the highest tertile compared to the lowest tertile). The association between soy protein intake and breast cancer survival did not differ according to ER/PR status, tumor stage, age at diagnosis, body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), or menopausal status. Additionally, the soy-survival association did not appear to vary according to XbaI or PvuII polymorphisms in ER-alpha, or C(14206)T, G(25652)A, or A(50766)G polymorphisms in ER-beta. These data suggest that soyfoods do not have an adverse effect on breast cancer survival. SN - 0167-6806 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15980986/Soyfood_intake_and_breast_cancer_survival:_a_followup_of_the_Shanghai_Breast_Cancer_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-004-6019-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -