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Effects of different types of exercise on body composition and fat distribution in HIV-infected patients: a brief review.
Can J Appl Physiol 2005; 30(2):233-45CJ

Abstract

HIV infection and its treatment is associated with unfavourable metabolic and morphological abnormalities. These metabolic abnormalities, particularly alterations in body composition and fat distribution, may increase the risk for cardiovascular and metabolic complications, as well as reduce functional independence and lower self-esteem. Thus there is an urgent need to develop interventions intended to manage secondary side effects of HIV or antiretroviral therapy-related complications. In poly-treated patients, nonpharmacological interventions are a logical first step. Exercise training in particular may help alleviate some of the metabolic adverse effects associated with antiretroviral therapy by favourably altering body composition and patterns of body fat distribution. Studies have shown that exercise training, particularly aerobic training, can help reduce total body and visceral fat, as well as normalizing lipid profiles in HIV-infected patients. The results for resistance training, however, are less conclusive. Knowledge of the use of resistance and aerobic training and its attendant effects on insulin resistance and adipocytokines may represent an effective nonpharmacologic means for treating metabolic complications of HIV-infected persons who are receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. In this brief review we examine the effects of aerobic and resistance training on body composition, body fat distribution, and selected metabolic outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Département de Nutrition, Faculté de Médicine, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Liliane de Stewart, 2405 Côte Ste Catherine, Montréal, Quebec H3C 3J7.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15981790

Citation

Malita, Florin M., et al. "Effects of Different Types of Exercise On Body Composition and Fat Distribution in HIV-infected Patients: a Brief Review." Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology = Revue Canadienne De Physiologie Appliquee, vol. 30, no. 2, 2005, pp. 233-45.
Malita FM, Karelis AD, Toma E, et al. Effects of different types of exercise on body composition and fat distribution in HIV-infected patients: a brief review. Can J Appl Physiol. 2005;30(2):233-45.
Malita, F. M., Karelis, A. D., Toma, E., & Rabasa-Lhoret, R. (2005). Effects of different types of exercise on body composition and fat distribution in HIV-infected patients: a brief review. Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology = Revue Canadienne De Physiologie Appliquee, 30(2), pp. 233-45.
Malita FM, et al. Effects of Different Types of Exercise On Body Composition and Fat Distribution in HIV-infected Patients: a Brief Review. Can J Appl Physiol. 2005;30(2):233-45. PubMed PMID: 15981790.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of different types of exercise on body composition and fat distribution in HIV-infected patients: a brief review. AU - Malita,Florin M, AU - Karelis,Antony D, AU - Toma,Emil, AU - Rabasa-Lhoret,Remi, PY - 2005/6/29/pubmed PY - 2005/7/27/medline PY - 2005/6/29/entrez SP - 233 EP - 45 JF - Canadian journal of applied physiology = Revue canadienne de physiologie appliquee JO - Can J Appl Physiol VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - HIV infection and its treatment is associated with unfavourable metabolic and morphological abnormalities. These metabolic abnormalities, particularly alterations in body composition and fat distribution, may increase the risk for cardiovascular and metabolic complications, as well as reduce functional independence and lower self-esteem. Thus there is an urgent need to develop interventions intended to manage secondary side effects of HIV or antiretroviral therapy-related complications. In poly-treated patients, nonpharmacological interventions are a logical first step. Exercise training in particular may help alleviate some of the metabolic adverse effects associated with antiretroviral therapy by favourably altering body composition and patterns of body fat distribution. Studies have shown that exercise training, particularly aerobic training, can help reduce total body and visceral fat, as well as normalizing lipid profiles in HIV-infected patients. The results for resistance training, however, are less conclusive. Knowledge of the use of resistance and aerobic training and its attendant effects on insulin resistance and adipocytokines may represent an effective nonpharmacologic means for treating metabolic complications of HIV-infected persons who are receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. In this brief review we examine the effects of aerobic and resistance training on body composition, body fat distribution, and selected metabolic outcomes. SN - 1066-7814 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15981790/full_citation L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=15981790 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -