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Should diabetes be considered a coronary heart disease risk equivalent?: results from 25 years of follow-up in the Renfrew and Paisley survey.
Diabetes Care 2005; 28(7):1588-93DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of our study was to confirm or refute the view that diabetes be regarded as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent and to test for sex differences in mortality.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

This was a prospective cohort study of 7,052 men and 8,354 women aged 45-64 years from Renfrew and Paisley, Scotland, who were first screened in 1972-1976 and followed for 25 years. All-cause mortality was calculated as death per 1,000 person-years. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust survival for age, smoking habit, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, BMI, and social class.

RESULTS

There were 192 deaths in 228 subjects with diabetes and 2,016 deaths in 3,076 subjects with CHD. The highest mortality was in the group with both diabetes and CHD (100.2 deaths/1,000 person-years in men, 93.6 in women) and the lowest in the group with neither (29.2 deaths/1,000 person-years in men, 19.4 in women). Men and women with diabetes only and CHD only formed an intermediate risk group. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for CHD mortality in men with diabetes only compared with men with CHD only was 1.17 (95% CI 0.78-1.74; P = 0.56). Corresponding HR for women was 1.97 (1.27-3.08; P = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS

Diabetes without previous CHD carries a lifetime risk of vascular death as high as that for CHD alone. Women may be at particular risk. Our data support the view that cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes should be treated as aggressively as in people with CHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Unit, Dumfries and Galloway Royal Infirmary, Dumfries DG1 4AP, Scotland, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15983305

Citation

Whiteley, Lucinda, et al. "Should Diabetes Be Considered a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Equivalent?: Results From 25 Years of Follow-up in the Renfrew and Paisley Survey." Diabetes Care, vol. 28, no. 7, 2005, pp. 1588-93.
Whiteley L, Padmanabhan S, Hole D, et al. Should diabetes be considered a coronary heart disease risk equivalent?: results from 25 years of follow-up in the Renfrew and Paisley survey. Diabetes Care. 2005;28(7):1588-93.
Whiteley, L., Padmanabhan, S., Hole, D., & Isles, C. (2005). Should diabetes be considered a coronary heart disease risk equivalent?: results from 25 years of follow-up in the Renfrew and Paisley survey. Diabetes Care, 28(7), pp. 1588-93.
Whiteley L, et al. Should Diabetes Be Considered a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Equivalent?: Results From 25 Years of Follow-up in the Renfrew and Paisley Survey. Diabetes Care. 2005;28(7):1588-93. PubMed PMID: 15983305.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Should diabetes be considered a coronary heart disease risk equivalent?: results from 25 years of follow-up in the Renfrew and Paisley survey. AU - Whiteley,Lucinda, AU - Padmanabhan,Sandosh, AU - Hole,David, AU - Isles,Chris, PY - 2005/6/29/pubmed PY - 2005/9/24/medline PY - 2005/6/29/entrez SP - 1588 EP - 93 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 28 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to confirm or refute the view that diabetes be regarded as a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent and to test for sex differences in mortality. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of 7,052 men and 8,354 women aged 45-64 years from Renfrew and Paisley, Scotland, who were first screened in 1972-1976 and followed for 25 years. All-cause mortality was calculated as death per 1,000 person-years. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust survival for age, smoking habit, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, BMI, and social class. RESULTS: There were 192 deaths in 228 subjects with diabetes and 2,016 deaths in 3,076 subjects with CHD. The highest mortality was in the group with both diabetes and CHD (100.2 deaths/1,000 person-years in men, 93.6 in women) and the lowest in the group with neither (29.2 deaths/1,000 person-years in men, 19.4 in women). Men and women with diabetes only and CHD only formed an intermediate risk group. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for CHD mortality in men with diabetes only compared with men with CHD only was 1.17 (95% CI 0.78-1.74; P = 0.56). Corresponding HR for women was 1.97 (1.27-3.08; P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes without previous CHD carries a lifetime risk of vascular death as high as that for CHD alone. Women may be at particular risk. Our data support the view that cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes should be treated as aggressively as in people with CHD. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15983305/Should_diabetes_be_considered_a_coronary_heart_disease_risk_equivalent:_results_from_25_years_of_follow_up_in_the_Renfrew_and_Paisley_survey_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15983305 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -