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Risk factors for colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients admitted to an urban hospital: emergence of community-associated MRSA nasal carriage.
Clin Infect Dis 2005; 41(2):159-66CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Surveillance cultures performed at hospital admission have been recommended to identify patients colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) but require substantial resources. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA colonization at the time of hospital admission among patients cared for at a public urban hospital.

METHODS

Anterior nares cultures were obtained within 48 h after admission during a 1-month period. A case-control study and molecular typing studies were performed.

RESULTS

A total of 53 (7.3%) of 726 patients had a nares culture positive for MRSA, and 119 (16.4%) had a nares culture that was positive for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for MRSA colonization included antibiotic use within 3 months before admission (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-5.0), hospitalization during the past 12 months (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.0-8.2), diagnosis of skin or soft-tissue infection at admission (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5-7.9), and HIV infection. A total of 47 (89%) of 53 case patients colonized with MRSA had at least 1 of these independent risk factors, in contrast to 343 (51%) of 673 control patients (OR, 7.5; 95% CI, 3.2 -17.9). Molecular typing demonstrated that 16 (30%) of 53 MRSA nares isolates (2.2% of the 726 isolates) belonged to the USA300 community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) genotype.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of MRSA colonization at the time of patient admission was high (>7%). Limiting surveillance cultures to patients with >or=1 of the identified risk factors may allow for targeted screening. The emergence of CA-MRSA colonization represents a new, unrecognized reservoir of MRSA within hospitals, potentially increasing the risk for horizontal transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15983910

Citation

Hidron, Alicia I., et al. "Risk Factors for Colonization With Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in Patients Admitted to an Urban Hospital: Emergence of Community-associated MRSA Nasal Carriage." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 41, no. 2, 2005, pp. 159-66.
Hidron AI, Kourbatova EV, Halvosa JS, et al. Risk factors for colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients admitted to an urban hospital: emergence of community-associated MRSA nasal carriage. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;41(2):159-66.
Hidron, A. I., Kourbatova, E. V., Halvosa, J. S., Terrell, B. J., McDougal, L. K., Tenover, F. C., ... King, M. D. (2005). Risk factors for colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients admitted to an urban hospital: emergence of community-associated MRSA nasal carriage. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 41(2), pp. 159-66.
Hidron AI, et al. Risk Factors for Colonization With Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in Patients Admitted to an Urban Hospital: Emergence of Community-associated MRSA Nasal Carriage. Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Jul 15;41(2):159-66. PubMed PMID: 15983910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients admitted to an urban hospital: emergence of community-associated MRSA nasal carriage. AU - Hidron,Alicia I, AU - Kourbatova,Ekaterina V, AU - Halvosa,J Sue, AU - Terrell,Bianca J, AU - McDougal,Linda K, AU - Tenover,Fred C, AU - Blumberg,Henry M, AU - King,Mark D, Y1 - 2005/06/08/ PY - 2004/11/11/received PY - 2005/02/23/accepted PY - 2005/6/29/pubmed PY - 2006/9/6/medline PY - 2005/6/29/entrez SP - 159 EP - 66 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 41 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Surveillance cultures performed at hospital admission have been recommended to identify patients colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) but require substantial resources. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA colonization at the time of hospital admission among patients cared for at a public urban hospital. METHODS: Anterior nares cultures were obtained within 48 h after admission during a 1-month period. A case-control study and molecular typing studies were performed. RESULTS: A total of 53 (7.3%) of 726 patients had a nares culture positive for MRSA, and 119 (16.4%) had a nares culture that was positive for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for MRSA colonization included antibiotic use within 3 months before admission (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-5.0), hospitalization during the past 12 months (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.0-8.2), diagnosis of skin or soft-tissue infection at admission (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5-7.9), and HIV infection. A total of 47 (89%) of 53 case patients colonized with MRSA had at least 1 of these independent risk factors, in contrast to 343 (51%) of 673 control patients (OR, 7.5; 95% CI, 3.2 -17.9). Molecular typing demonstrated that 16 (30%) of 53 MRSA nares isolates (2.2% of the 726 isolates) belonged to the USA300 community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) genotype. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of MRSA colonization at the time of patient admission was high (>7%). Limiting surveillance cultures to patients with >or=1 of the identified risk factors may allow for targeted screening. The emergence of CA-MRSA colonization represents a new, unrecognized reservoir of MRSA within hospitals, potentially increasing the risk for horizontal transmission. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15983910/Risk_factors_for_colonization_with_methicillin_resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus__MRSA__in_patients_admitted_to_an_urban_hospital:_emergence_of_community_associated_MRSA_nasal_carriage_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/430910 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -