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Intergenerational transmission of role reversal between parent and child: dyadic and family systems internal working models.
Attach Hum Dev. 2005 Mar; 7(1):51-65.AH

Abstract

The current study examined the intergenerational transmission of role reversal within a developmental psychopathology framework. Role reversal is a relationship disturbance in which a parent looks to a child to meet the parent's need for comfort, parenting, intimacy, or play, and the child attempts to meet these needs. In a normative sample, n=138, fathers and mothers reported on childhood role reversal with their mothers as part of the Adult Attachment Interview, AAI (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1984). Mother-child role reversal was then assessed in an observational paradigm when children were 2 years of age. Based on theories of dyadic and family systems internal working models we hypothesized gender specific replications of role reversal in the next generation. Indeed, mothers who reported role reversal with their mothers during the AAI tended to engage in higher levels of role reversal with their toddler-aged daughters. Furthermore, when fathers reported role reversal with their mothers during the AAI, mothers tended to engage in higher levels of role reversal with their toddler-aged sons. The importance of the inclusion of fathers in family research, the relationship between role reversal and attachment, and implications for preventive interventions are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, 301 E Austin Peay, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0900, USA. macfie@utk.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15984085

Citation

Macfie, Jenny, et al. "Intergenerational Transmission of Role Reversal Between Parent and Child: Dyadic and Family Systems Internal Working Models." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 7, no. 1, 2005, pp. 51-65.
Macfie J, McElwain NL, Houts RM, et al. Intergenerational transmission of role reversal between parent and child: dyadic and family systems internal working models. Attach Hum Dev. 2005;7(1):51-65.
Macfie, J., McElwain, N. L., Houts, R. M., & Cox, M. J. (2005). Intergenerational transmission of role reversal between parent and child: dyadic and family systems internal working models. Attachment & Human Development, 7(1), 51-65.
Macfie J, et al. Intergenerational Transmission of Role Reversal Between Parent and Child: Dyadic and Family Systems Internal Working Models. Attach Hum Dev. 2005;7(1):51-65. PubMed PMID: 15984085.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intergenerational transmission of role reversal between parent and child: dyadic and family systems internal working models. AU - Macfie,Jenny, AU - McElwain,Nancy L, AU - Houts,Renate M, AU - Cox,Martha J, PY - 2005/6/30/pubmed PY - 2005/7/13/medline PY - 2005/6/30/entrez SP - 51 EP - 65 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - The current study examined the intergenerational transmission of role reversal within a developmental psychopathology framework. Role reversal is a relationship disturbance in which a parent looks to a child to meet the parent's need for comfort, parenting, intimacy, or play, and the child attempts to meet these needs. In a normative sample, n=138, fathers and mothers reported on childhood role reversal with their mothers as part of the Adult Attachment Interview, AAI (George, Kaplan, & Main, 1984). Mother-child role reversal was then assessed in an observational paradigm when children were 2 years of age. Based on theories of dyadic and family systems internal working models we hypothesized gender specific replications of role reversal in the next generation. Indeed, mothers who reported role reversal with their mothers during the AAI tended to engage in higher levels of role reversal with their toddler-aged daughters. Furthermore, when fathers reported role reversal with their mothers during the AAI, mothers tended to engage in higher levels of role reversal with their toddler-aged sons. The importance of the inclusion of fathers in family research, the relationship between role reversal and attachment, and implications for preventive interventions are discussed. SN - 1461-6734 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15984085/Intergenerational_transmission_of_role_reversal_between_parent_and_child:_dyadic_and_family_systems_internal_working_models_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616730500039663 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -