Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Presentation and diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis: relevance of eosinophilia, microscopy for ova, and serology.
J Travel Med. 2005 Jan-Feb; 12(1):9-13.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In nonendemic countries a steady rise in cases of imported schistosomiasis has been observed. The objective of this study was to describe the presentation of patients diagnosed with schistosomiasis in the Outpatient Department (OPD) for Tropical Diseases in the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

METHODS

In a retrospective study, patients with schistosomiasis from our OPD (1997-1999), including a subgroup of persons asking for screening for schistosomiasis and found positive, were analyzed. Diagnosis was based on freshwater exposure in an endemic area and positive serology for schistosomal antibodies. The following data were recorded: age, gender, country of birth, travel destination, symptoms, eosinophil count, and results of serology and stool and urine microscopy.

RESULTS

Seventy-eight patients (42 travelers, 16 expatriates, and 20 immigrants) were diagnosed with schistosomiasis; 47% were infected in southern Africa. Twenty-four percent had specific symptoms, 57% had eosinophilia, and in 17 patients (22%) Schistosoma ova were found. Eleven travelers suffered from Katayama syndrome. Of the subgroup of 42 persons screened for schistosomiasis, 15 (36%) had schistosomal antibodies; the majority of these persons (10/15 [67%]) were infected in southern Africa.

CONCLUSION

In our OPD schistosomiasis was diagnosed in about 26 patients per year, 3% of all new presentations. Infections were almost exclusively acquired in Africa. In travelers high eosinophilia was due to acute schistosomiasis; in immigrants it was due to concomitant helminthic infections. One of three people asking to be screened for schistosomiasis had schistosomal antibodies. Eosinophilia was indicative but an insufficient screening tool, and stool and urine microscopy for ova were not sensitive. Screening by serology is easy and reliable and the method of choice in asymptomatic persons with a history of freshwater exposure in a high-risk area.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Subdepartment of Infectious Diseases, Tropical Medicine and AIDS, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15996461

Citation

Bierman, Wouter F W., et al. "Presentation and Diagnosis of Imported Schistosomiasis: Relevance of Eosinophilia, Microscopy for Ova, and Serology." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 12, no. 1, 2005, pp. 9-13.
Bierman WF, Wetsteyn JC, van Gool T. Presentation and diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis: relevance of eosinophilia, microscopy for ova, and serology. J Travel Med. 2005;12(1):9-13.
Bierman, W. F., Wetsteyn, J. C., & van Gool, T. (2005). Presentation and diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis: relevance of eosinophilia, microscopy for ova, and serology. Journal of Travel Medicine, 12(1), 9-13.
Bierman WF, Wetsteyn JC, van Gool T. Presentation and Diagnosis of Imported Schistosomiasis: Relevance of Eosinophilia, Microscopy for Ova, and Serology. J Travel Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;12(1):9-13. PubMed PMID: 15996461.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Presentation and diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis: relevance of eosinophilia, microscopy for ova, and serology. AU - Bierman,Wouter F W, AU - Wetsteyn,José C F M, AU - van Gool,Tom, PY - 2005/7/6/pubmed PY - 2005/7/22/medline PY - 2005/7/6/entrez SP - 9 EP - 13 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: In nonendemic countries a steady rise in cases of imported schistosomiasis has been observed. The objective of this study was to describe the presentation of patients diagnosed with schistosomiasis in the Outpatient Department (OPD) for Tropical Diseases in the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: In a retrospective study, patients with schistosomiasis from our OPD (1997-1999), including a subgroup of persons asking for screening for schistosomiasis and found positive, were analyzed. Diagnosis was based on freshwater exposure in an endemic area and positive serology for schistosomal antibodies. The following data were recorded: age, gender, country of birth, travel destination, symptoms, eosinophil count, and results of serology and stool and urine microscopy. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients (42 travelers, 16 expatriates, and 20 immigrants) were diagnosed with schistosomiasis; 47% were infected in southern Africa. Twenty-four percent had specific symptoms, 57% had eosinophilia, and in 17 patients (22%) Schistosoma ova were found. Eleven travelers suffered from Katayama syndrome. Of the subgroup of 42 persons screened for schistosomiasis, 15 (36%) had schistosomal antibodies; the majority of these persons (10/15 [67%]) were infected in southern Africa. CONCLUSION: In our OPD schistosomiasis was diagnosed in about 26 patients per year, 3% of all new presentations. Infections were almost exclusively acquired in Africa. In travelers high eosinophilia was due to acute schistosomiasis; in immigrants it was due to concomitant helminthic infections. One of three people asking to be screened for schistosomiasis had schistosomal antibodies. Eosinophilia was indicative but an insufficient screening tool, and stool and urine microscopy for ova were not sensitive. Screening by serology is easy and reliable and the method of choice in asymptomatic persons with a history of freshwater exposure in a high-risk area. SN - 1195-1982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15996461/Presentation_and_diagnosis_of_imported_schistosomiasis:_relevance_of_eosinophilia_microscopy_for_ova_and_serology_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.2310/7060.2005.00003 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -