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The effects of heating and cooling on ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema and pigmentation in human skin.
Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2005 Aug; 21(4):198-203.PP

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE

As most biochemical systems are affected by temperature, thermal changes before or after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation could influence skin vascular blood flow changes and inflammatory responses. In this study, our aim was to investigate the influence of thermal changes on UV-induced acute skin reactions, namely, erythema and pigmentation.

METHODS

Our volunteers consisted of 10 males, with ages ranging from 22 to 24 years and with Fitzpatrick's skin type III or IV. Skin temperatures were changed with a 45 degrees C heating pad or by ice pack application before or after UV irradiation (control, 1 minimal erythema dose (MED), 2 MED) and then changes in erythema and pigmentation were measured by a Minolta Spectrophotometer CM-2002.

RESULTS

The present study demonstrates that both heating and cooling increase skin erythema and reduce pigmentation, and that the timing of heating and cooling influences the UV-induced skin reaction. Pre-heating and post-cooling groups showed more UV-induced erythema than the post-heating and pre-cooling groups, respectively.

CONCLUSION

Our results indicate that alteration of skin surface temperature could modulate UV-induced erythema and pigmentation responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15998368

Citation

Youn, Choon Shik, et al. "The Effects of Heating and Cooling On Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Erythema and Pigmentation in Human Skin." Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, vol. 21, no. 4, 2005, pp. 198-203.
Youn CS, Kwon OS, Hwang EJ, et al. The effects of heating and cooling on ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema and pigmentation in human skin. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2005;21(4):198-203.
Youn, C. S., Kwon, O. S., Hwang, E. J., Jo, S. J., Lee, M. J., Lee, H. S., & Chung, J. H. (2005). The effects of heating and cooling on ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema and pigmentation in human skin. Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, 21(4), 198-203.
Youn CS, et al. The Effects of Heating and Cooling On Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Erythema and Pigmentation in Human Skin. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed. 2005;21(4):198-203. PubMed PMID: 15998368.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of heating and cooling on ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema and pigmentation in human skin. AU - Youn,Choon Shik, AU - Kwon,Oh Sang, AU - Hwang,Eun Ju, AU - Jo,Seong Jin, AU - Lee,Min Jeong, AU - Lee,Hyun Seung, AU - Chung,Jin Ho, PY - 2005/7/7/pubmed PY - 2005/11/11/medline PY - 2005/7/7/entrez SP - 198 EP - 203 JF - Photodermatology, photoimmunology & photomedicine JO - Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: As most biochemical systems are affected by temperature, thermal changes before or after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation could influence skin vascular blood flow changes and inflammatory responses. In this study, our aim was to investigate the influence of thermal changes on UV-induced acute skin reactions, namely, erythema and pigmentation. METHODS: Our volunteers consisted of 10 males, with ages ranging from 22 to 24 years and with Fitzpatrick's skin type III or IV. Skin temperatures were changed with a 45 degrees C heating pad or by ice pack application before or after UV irradiation (control, 1 minimal erythema dose (MED), 2 MED) and then changes in erythema and pigmentation were measured by a Minolta Spectrophotometer CM-2002. RESULTS: The present study demonstrates that both heating and cooling increase skin erythema and reduce pigmentation, and that the timing of heating and cooling influences the UV-induced skin reaction. Pre-heating and post-cooling groups showed more UV-induced erythema than the post-heating and pre-cooling groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that alteration of skin surface temperature could modulate UV-induced erythema and pigmentation responses. SN - 0905-4383 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15998368/The_effects_of_heating_and_cooling_on_ultraviolet_radiation_induced_erythema_and_pigmentation_in_human_skin_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0781.2005.00161.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -