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Epidemiology of lacrosse injuries in high school-aged girls and boys: a 3-year prospective study.
Am J Sports Med. 2005 Sep; 33(9):1305-14.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the types, mechanisms, and circumstances of lacrosse injuries incurred by high school-aged girls and boys during organized interscholastic and summer camp games.

STUDY DESIGN

Descriptive epidemiology study.

METHODS

For 3 years, the authors gathered data on girls' and boys' lacrosse injuries for 359 040 high school and 28 318 summer camp athletic exposures using a lacrosse-specific computerized injury surveillance system. The most prevalent injuries were organized into multifactorial injury scenarios.

RESULTS

In high school play, the injury rate for adolescent boys (2.89 per 1000 athletic exposures) was slightly higher than that for girls (2.54 per 1000 athletic exposures) (incidence rate ratio = 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30). The most prevalent injuries for adolescent girls and boys were knee and ankle sprains resulting from noncontact mechanisms. Male players had significantly higher rates of shoulder, neck, trunk, and back injuries and higher game-to-practice injury ratios. In addition, they had higher rates of concussive events from player-to-player contact. Female players had higher rates of overall head injuries, many involving contusions and abrasions from stick and ball contact.

CONCLUSIONS

The overall injury rates for boys' and girls' high school lacrosse were significantly lower than those for collegiate play. Significant differences existed between adolescent boys and girls with respect to injury mechanisms, body parts injured, and player and team activity at the time of injury.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopaedics, Union Memorial Hospital, 3333 North Calvert Street #400, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16000657

Citation

Hinton, Richard Y., et al. "Epidemiology of Lacrosse Injuries in High School-aged Girls and Boys: a 3-year Prospective Study." The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 33, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1305-14.
Hinton RY, Lincoln AE, Almquist JL, et al. Epidemiology of lacrosse injuries in high school-aged girls and boys: a 3-year prospective study. Am J Sports Med. 2005;33(9):1305-14.
Hinton, R. Y., Lincoln, A. E., Almquist, J. L., Douoguih, W. A., & Sharma, K. M. (2005). Epidemiology of lacrosse injuries in high school-aged girls and boys: a 3-year prospective study. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 33(9), 1305-14.
Hinton RY, et al. Epidemiology of Lacrosse Injuries in High School-aged Girls and Boys: a 3-year Prospective Study. Am J Sports Med. 2005;33(9):1305-14. PubMed PMID: 16000657.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of lacrosse injuries in high school-aged girls and boys: a 3-year prospective study. AU - Hinton,Richard Y, AU - Lincoln,Andrew E, AU - Almquist,Jon L, AU - Douoguih,Wiemi A, AU - Sharma,Krishn M, Y1 - 2005/07/06/ PY - 2005/7/8/pubmed PY - 2005/12/24/medline PY - 2005/7/8/entrez SP - 1305 EP - 14 JF - The American journal of sports medicine JO - Am J Sports Med VL - 33 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To report the types, mechanisms, and circumstances of lacrosse injuries incurred by high school-aged girls and boys during organized interscholastic and summer camp games. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: For 3 years, the authors gathered data on girls' and boys' lacrosse injuries for 359 040 high school and 28 318 summer camp athletic exposures using a lacrosse-specific computerized injury surveillance system. The most prevalent injuries were organized into multifactorial injury scenarios. RESULTS: In high school play, the injury rate for adolescent boys (2.89 per 1000 athletic exposures) was slightly higher than that for girls (2.54 per 1000 athletic exposures) (incidence rate ratio = 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30). The most prevalent injuries for adolescent girls and boys were knee and ankle sprains resulting from noncontact mechanisms. Male players had significantly higher rates of shoulder, neck, trunk, and back injuries and higher game-to-practice injury ratios. In addition, they had higher rates of concussive events from player-to-player contact. Female players had higher rates of overall head injuries, many involving contusions and abrasions from stick and ball contact. CONCLUSIONS: The overall injury rates for boys' and girls' high school lacrosse were significantly lower than those for collegiate play. Significant differences existed between adolescent boys and girls with respect to injury mechanisms, body parts injured, and player and team activity at the time of injury. SN - 0363-5465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16000657/Epidemiology_of_lacrosse_injuries_in_high_school_aged_girls_and_boys:_a_3_year_prospective_study_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546504274148?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -