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Stress-induced changes in human salivary alpha-amylase activity -- associations with adrenergic activity.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006 Jan; 31(1):49-58.P

Abstract

The salivary enzyme alpha-amylase has been proposed to indicate stress-reactive bodily changes. A previous study by the authors revealed marked increases in salivary alpha-amylase following psychosocial stress, indicating a stress-dependent activation of salivary alpha-amylase. Salivary alpha-amylase has been suggested to reflect catecholaminergic reactivity. Our aim was to assess/evaluate a possible relationship between salivary alpha-amylase and adrenergic parameters, i.e. catecholamines, as well as other stress markers. Using an intra-individual repeated measures design, 30 healthy young men underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which consists of a mental arithmetic task and free speech in front of an audience and a control condition in randomized order. Salivary alpha-amylase and salivary cortisol as well as plasma catecholamines and cardiovascular activity were repeatedly measured before, during, and after both conditions. Significant differences were found between the stress and the rest condition in salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, plasma catecholamines, and cardiovascular parameters (heart rate, LF, HF, LF/HF). However, general alpha-amylase responses (area under the curve) were not associated with general responses in catecholamines and cortisol in the stress condition (r smaller than 0.25 for all analyses). Analysis of cardiovascular parameters indicates a positive relationship between amylase and sympathetic tone (LF/HF) during stress. Salivary alpha-amylase is sensitive to psychosocial stress. Since it does not seem to be closely related to other biological stress markers such as catecholamines and cortisol, salivary alpha-amylase may be a useful additional parameter for the measurement of stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zürich, Zürichbergstr. 43, CH-8044 Zürich, Switzerland. u.nater@psychologie.unizh.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16002223

Citation

Nater, Urs Markus, et al. "Stress-induced Changes in Human Salivary Alpha-amylase Activity -- Associations With Adrenergic Activity." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 31, no. 1, 2006, pp. 49-58.
Nater UM, La Marca R, Florin L, et al. Stress-induced changes in human salivary alpha-amylase activity -- associations with adrenergic activity. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006;31(1):49-58.
Nater, U. M., La Marca, R., Florin, L., Moses, A., Langhans, W., Koller, M. M., & Ehlert, U. (2006). Stress-induced changes in human salivary alpha-amylase activity -- associations with adrenergic activity. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 31(1), 49-58.
Nater UM, et al. Stress-induced Changes in Human Salivary Alpha-amylase Activity -- Associations With Adrenergic Activity. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006;31(1):49-58. PubMed PMID: 16002223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stress-induced changes in human salivary alpha-amylase activity -- associations with adrenergic activity. AU - Nater,Urs Markus, AU - La Marca,Roberto, AU - Florin,Ladina, AU - Moses,Anthony, AU - Langhans,Wolfgang, AU - Koller,Markus M, AU - Ehlert,Ulrike, Y1 - 2005/07/05/ PY - 2005/04/04/received PY - 2005/04/28/revised PY - 2005/05/04/accepted PY - 2005/7/9/pubmed PY - 2006/2/28/medline PY - 2005/7/9/entrez SP - 49 EP - 58 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - The salivary enzyme alpha-amylase has been proposed to indicate stress-reactive bodily changes. A previous study by the authors revealed marked increases in salivary alpha-amylase following psychosocial stress, indicating a stress-dependent activation of salivary alpha-amylase. Salivary alpha-amylase has been suggested to reflect catecholaminergic reactivity. Our aim was to assess/evaluate a possible relationship between salivary alpha-amylase and adrenergic parameters, i.e. catecholamines, as well as other stress markers. Using an intra-individual repeated measures design, 30 healthy young men underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which consists of a mental arithmetic task and free speech in front of an audience and a control condition in randomized order. Salivary alpha-amylase and salivary cortisol as well as plasma catecholamines and cardiovascular activity were repeatedly measured before, during, and after both conditions. Significant differences were found between the stress and the rest condition in salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, plasma catecholamines, and cardiovascular parameters (heart rate, LF, HF, LF/HF). However, general alpha-amylase responses (area under the curve) were not associated with general responses in catecholamines and cortisol in the stress condition (r smaller than 0.25 for all analyses). Analysis of cardiovascular parameters indicates a positive relationship between amylase and sympathetic tone (LF/HF) during stress. Salivary alpha-amylase is sensitive to psychosocial stress. Since it does not seem to be closely related to other biological stress markers such as catecholamines and cortisol, salivary alpha-amylase may be a useful additional parameter for the measurement of stress. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16002223/Stress_induced_changes_in_human_salivary_alpha_amylase_activity____associations_with_adrenergic_activity_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(05)00126-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -