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Associations of paternal involvement in disease management with maternal and family outcomes in families with children with chronic illness.
J Pediatr Psychol. 2006 Jun; 31(5):481-9.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The role of fathers in pediatric disease management and its associations with family functioning have rarely been the focus of empirical study. In this study, we used the Dads Active Disease Support scale (DADS), a measure of the amount and helpfulness of paternal involvement in pediatric disease management, to explore the association between father involvement and other aspects of family functioning.

METHOD

A sample of 190 heterosexual couples completed the DADS and measures of maternal, marital, and family functioning.

RESULTS

Maternal report of higher ratings on DADS Helpfulness scale was associated with fewer self-reported maternal psychiatric symptoms and less perceived impact of the disease on family functioning. Both mothers' and fathers' reports indicated that more paternal involvement was related to more favorable outcomes in marital satisfaction and family functioning.

CONCLUSIONS

More paternal involvement in disease management was associated with healthier maternal, marital, and family functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether paternal involvement is likely to be a fruitful target for psychological intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Behavioral Pediatrics, Nemours Children's Clinic at Orlando, Florida 32806, USA. lagavin@nemours.orgNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16002480

Citation

Gavin, Leslie, and Tim Wysocki. "Associations of Paternal Involvement in Disease Management With Maternal and Family Outcomes in Families With Children With Chronic Illness." Journal of Pediatric Psychology, vol. 31, no. 5, 2006, pp. 481-9.
Gavin L, Wysocki T. Associations of paternal involvement in disease management with maternal and family outcomes in families with children with chronic illness. J Pediatr Psychol. 2006;31(5):481-9.
Gavin, L., & Wysocki, T. (2006). Associations of paternal involvement in disease management with maternal and family outcomes in families with children with chronic illness. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 31(5), 481-9.
Gavin L, Wysocki T. Associations of Paternal Involvement in Disease Management With Maternal and Family Outcomes in Families With Children With Chronic Illness. J Pediatr Psychol. 2006;31(5):481-9. PubMed PMID: 16002480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of paternal involvement in disease management with maternal and family outcomes in families with children with chronic illness. AU - Gavin,Leslie, AU - Wysocki,Tim, Y1 - 2005/07/07/ PY - 2005/7/9/pubmed PY - 2006/7/26/medline PY - 2005/7/9/entrez SP - 481 EP - 9 JF - Journal of pediatric psychology JO - J Pediatr Psychol VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The role of fathers in pediatric disease management and its associations with family functioning have rarely been the focus of empirical study. In this study, we used the Dads Active Disease Support scale (DADS), a measure of the amount and helpfulness of paternal involvement in pediatric disease management, to explore the association between father involvement and other aspects of family functioning. METHOD: A sample of 190 heterosexual couples completed the DADS and measures of maternal, marital, and family functioning. RESULTS: Maternal report of higher ratings on DADS Helpfulness scale was associated with fewer self-reported maternal psychiatric symptoms and less perceived impact of the disease on family functioning. Both mothers' and fathers' reports indicated that more paternal involvement was related to more favorable outcomes in marital satisfaction and family functioning. CONCLUSIONS: More paternal involvement in disease management was associated with healthier maternal, marital, and family functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether paternal involvement is likely to be a fruitful target for psychological intervention. SN - 0146-8693 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16002480/Associations_of_paternal_involvement_in_disease_management_with_maternal_and_family_outcomes_in_families_with_children_with_chronic_illness_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jpepsy/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jpepsy/jsj043 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -