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Inactivity, exercise, and visceral fat. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount.
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2005 Oct; 99(4):1613-8.JA

Abstract

Despite the importance of randomized, dose-response studies for proper evaluation of effective clinical interventions, there have been no dose-response studies on the effects of exercise amount on abdominal obesity, a major risk factor for metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. One hundred seventy-five sedentary, overweight men and women with mild to moderate dyslipidemia were randomly assigned to participate for 6 mo in a control group or for approximately 8 mo in one of three exercise groups: 1) low amount, moderate intensity, equivalent to walking 12 miles/wk (19.2 km) at 40-55% of peak oxygen consumption; 2) low amount, vigorous intensity, equivalent to jogging 12 miles/wk at 65-80% of peak oxygen consumption; or 3) high amount, vigorous intensity, equivalent to jogging 20 miles/wk (32.0 km). Computed tomography scans were analyzed for abdominal fat. Controls gained visceral fat (8.6 +/- 17.2%; P = 0.001). The equivalent of 11 miles of exercise per week, at either intensity, prevented significant accumulation of visceral fat. The highest amount of exercise resulted in decreased visceral (-6.9 +/- 20.8%; P = 0.038) and subcutaneous (-7.0 +/- 10.8%; P < 0.001) abdominal fat. Significant gains in visceral fat over only 6 mo emphasize the high cost of continued inactivity. A modest exercise program, consistent with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control/American College of Sports Medicine (CDC/ACSM), prevented significant increases in visceral fat. Importantly, a modest increase over the CDC/ACSM exercise recommendations resulted in significant decreases in visceral, subcutaneous, and total abdominal fat without changes in caloric intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16002776

Citation

Slentz, Cris A., et al. "Inactivity, Exercise, and Visceral Fat. STRRIDE: a Randomized, Controlled Study of Exercise Intensity and Amount." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 99, no. 4, 2005, pp. 1613-8.
Slentz CA, Aiken LB, Houmard JA, et al. Inactivity, exercise, and visceral fat. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2005;99(4):1613-8.
Slentz, C. A., Aiken, L. B., Houmard, J. A., Bales, C. W., Johnson, J. L., Tanner, C. J., Duscha, B. D., & Kraus, W. E. (2005). Inactivity, exercise, and visceral fat. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 99(4), 1613-8.
Slentz CA, et al. Inactivity, Exercise, and Visceral Fat. STRRIDE: a Randomized, Controlled Study of Exercise Intensity and Amount. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2005;99(4):1613-8. PubMed PMID: 16002776.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inactivity, exercise, and visceral fat. STRRIDE: a randomized, controlled study of exercise intensity and amount. AU - Slentz,Cris A, AU - Aiken,Lori B, AU - Houmard,Joseph A, AU - Bales,Connie W, AU - Johnson,Johanna L, AU - Tanner,Charles J, AU - Duscha,Brian D, AU - Kraus,William E, Y1 - 2005/07/07/ PY - 2005/7/9/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/7/9/entrez SP - 1613 EP - 8 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J Appl Physiol (1985) VL - 99 IS - 4 N2 - Despite the importance of randomized, dose-response studies for proper evaluation of effective clinical interventions, there have been no dose-response studies on the effects of exercise amount on abdominal obesity, a major risk factor for metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. One hundred seventy-five sedentary, overweight men and women with mild to moderate dyslipidemia were randomly assigned to participate for 6 mo in a control group or for approximately 8 mo in one of three exercise groups: 1) low amount, moderate intensity, equivalent to walking 12 miles/wk (19.2 km) at 40-55% of peak oxygen consumption; 2) low amount, vigorous intensity, equivalent to jogging 12 miles/wk at 65-80% of peak oxygen consumption; or 3) high amount, vigorous intensity, equivalent to jogging 20 miles/wk (32.0 km). Computed tomography scans were analyzed for abdominal fat. Controls gained visceral fat (8.6 +/- 17.2%; P = 0.001). The equivalent of 11 miles of exercise per week, at either intensity, prevented significant accumulation of visceral fat. The highest amount of exercise resulted in decreased visceral (-6.9 +/- 20.8%; P = 0.038) and subcutaneous (-7.0 +/- 10.8%; P < 0.001) abdominal fat. Significant gains in visceral fat over only 6 mo emphasize the high cost of continued inactivity. A modest exercise program, consistent with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control/American College of Sports Medicine (CDC/ACSM), prevented significant increases in visceral fat. Importantly, a modest increase over the CDC/ACSM exercise recommendations resulted in significant decreases in visceral, subcutaneous, and total abdominal fat without changes in caloric intake. SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16002776/Inactivity_exercise_and_visceral_fat__STRRIDE:_a_randomized_controlled_study_of_exercise_intensity_and_amount_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/japplphysiol.00124.2005?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -