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Heavy metal concentrations in a soil-plant-snail food chain along a terrestrial soil pollution gradient.
Environ Pollut. 2005 Nov; 138(1):178-90.EP

Abstract

We investigated concentrations of Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb in the compartments of a soil-plant (Urtica dioica)-snail (Cepaea nemoralis) food chain in four polluted locations in the Biesbosch floodplains, the Netherlands, and two reference locations. Total soil metal concentrations in the polluted locations were 4-20 times higher than those in the reference locations. Positive relationships between the generally low leaf concentrations and the soil concentrations were found for Zn only (r2 = 0.20). Bioaccumulation of Zn, Cu and Cd was observed in the snail tissues. We found positive relationships between the snail and leaf concentrations for all metals (range r2 = 0.19-0.46). The relationships between soil and snail concentrations were also positive, except for Cu (range r2 = 0.15-0.33). These results suggest transfer of metals to C. nemoralis snails from U. dioica leaves and from the soil. Metal transfer from polluted leaves to C. nemoralis is more important than transfer from the soil.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Ecological Science, Department of Systems Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. martje.notten@ecology.falw.vu.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16005127

Citation

Notten, M J M., et al. "Heavy Metal Concentrations in a Soil-plant-snail Food Chain Along a Terrestrial Soil Pollution Gradient." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 138, no. 1, 2005, pp. 178-90.
Notten MJ, Oosthoek AJ, Rozema J, et al. Heavy metal concentrations in a soil-plant-snail food chain along a terrestrial soil pollution gradient. Environ Pollut. 2005;138(1):178-90.
Notten, M. J., Oosthoek, A. J., Rozema, J., & Aerts, R. (2005). Heavy metal concentrations in a soil-plant-snail food chain along a terrestrial soil pollution gradient. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 138(1), 178-90.
Notten MJ, et al. Heavy Metal Concentrations in a Soil-plant-snail Food Chain Along a Terrestrial Soil Pollution Gradient. Environ Pollut. 2005;138(1):178-90. PubMed PMID: 16005127.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heavy metal concentrations in a soil-plant-snail food chain along a terrestrial soil pollution gradient. AU - Notten,M J M, AU - Oosthoek,A J P, AU - Rozema,J, AU - Aerts,R, PY - 2004/04/02/received PY - 2005/01/07/accepted PY - 2005/7/12/pubmed PY - 2006/1/10/medline PY - 2005/7/12/entrez SP - 178 EP - 90 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ Pollut VL - 138 IS - 1 N2 - We investigated concentrations of Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb in the compartments of a soil-plant (Urtica dioica)-snail (Cepaea nemoralis) food chain in four polluted locations in the Biesbosch floodplains, the Netherlands, and two reference locations. Total soil metal concentrations in the polluted locations were 4-20 times higher than those in the reference locations. Positive relationships between the generally low leaf concentrations and the soil concentrations were found for Zn only (r2 = 0.20). Bioaccumulation of Zn, Cu and Cd was observed in the snail tissues. We found positive relationships between the snail and leaf concentrations for all metals (range r2 = 0.19-0.46). The relationships between soil and snail concentrations were also positive, except for Cu (range r2 = 0.15-0.33). These results suggest transfer of metals to C. nemoralis snails from U. dioica leaves and from the soil. Metal transfer from polluted leaves to C. nemoralis is more important than transfer from the soil. SN - 0269-7491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16005127/Heavy_metal_concentrations_in_a_soil_plant_snail_food_chain_along_a_terrestrial_soil_pollution_gradient_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(05)00072-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -