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Effect of copper-tolerant rhizosphere bacteria on mobility of copper in soil and copper accumulation by Elsholtzia splendens.
Environ Int. 2005 Aug; 31(6):861-6.EI

Abstract

The role of rhizosphere bacteria in facilitating the solubility of copper (Cu) in contaminated soil and Cu accumulation in plant were studied. The bacteria strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of Elsholtzia splendens, a Cu accumulator growing on Tonglu Mountain copper mines. After the sandy soils containing 237 mg kg(-1) were incubated with the bacteria strains, it was indicated that rhizosphere microbes played an important role in influencing the availability of water-soluble Cu in soils. Soils had greater concentrations of water-extractable Cu compared with axenic soils inoculated with different bacterial strains. Further evidence for bacterial facilitation of increased solubility of Cu in the soil was obtained using the antibiotic ampicillin (0.1 mg g(-1)). There were 36% decreases in Cu concentration in the presence of bacterial strain MS12 and ampicillin together compared with bacterial inoculation alone. Different bacterial strains had different abilities on soil water-soluble Cu. To achieve the highest rates of plant Cu accumulation, it was necessary for bacteria to be present in the rhizosphere of E. splendens. Inoculated plants supplied with 20 micromol L(-1) CuSO4 had significantly greater concentrations of Cu in shoots and roots than uninoculated plants and bacterial strain MS2 was the most effective strain in promoting plant Cu uptake. There were 2.2-fold and 2.5-fold increases in Cu accumulation in the shoots and roots of plants inoculated with strain MS2 compared to axenic controls. Furthermore, when ampicillin and the bacterial strains were added together to the nutrient solution, the Cu concentrations in roots and shoots of ampicillin-treated plants were lower than those in inoculated plants. When ampicillin was added to the nutrient solution, Cu accumulation was inhibited by about 24-44% in shoots and 20-44% in roots. The above results provided a new insight into the phytoremediation of Cu-contaminated soil.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029, China. yxchen@zju.edu.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16005516

Citation

Chen, Ying Xu, et al. "Effect of Copper-tolerant Rhizosphere Bacteria On Mobility of Copper in Soil and Copper Accumulation By Elsholtzia Splendens." Environment International, vol. 31, no. 6, 2005, pp. 861-6.
Chen YX, Wang YP, Lin Q, et al. Effect of copper-tolerant rhizosphere bacteria on mobility of copper in soil and copper accumulation by Elsholtzia splendens. Environ Int. 2005;31(6):861-6.
Chen, Y. X., Wang, Y. P., Lin, Q., & Luo, Y. M. (2005). Effect of copper-tolerant rhizosphere bacteria on mobility of copper in soil and copper accumulation by Elsholtzia splendens. Environment International, 31(6), 861-6.
Chen YX, et al. Effect of Copper-tolerant Rhizosphere Bacteria On Mobility of Copper in Soil and Copper Accumulation By Elsholtzia Splendens. Environ Int. 2005;31(6):861-6. PubMed PMID: 16005516.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of copper-tolerant rhizosphere bacteria on mobility of copper in soil and copper accumulation by Elsholtzia splendens. AU - Chen,Ying Xu, AU - Wang,Yuan Peng, AU - Lin,Qi, AU - Luo,Yong Ming, PY - 2005/7/12/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/7/12/entrez SP - 861 EP - 6 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 31 IS - 6 N2 - The role of rhizosphere bacteria in facilitating the solubility of copper (Cu) in contaminated soil and Cu accumulation in plant were studied. The bacteria strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of Elsholtzia splendens, a Cu accumulator growing on Tonglu Mountain copper mines. After the sandy soils containing 237 mg kg(-1) were incubated with the bacteria strains, it was indicated that rhizosphere microbes played an important role in influencing the availability of water-soluble Cu in soils. Soils had greater concentrations of water-extractable Cu compared with axenic soils inoculated with different bacterial strains. Further evidence for bacterial facilitation of increased solubility of Cu in the soil was obtained using the antibiotic ampicillin (0.1 mg g(-1)). There were 36% decreases in Cu concentration in the presence of bacterial strain MS12 and ampicillin together compared with bacterial inoculation alone. Different bacterial strains had different abilities on soil water-soluble Cu. To achieve the highest rates of plant Cu accumulation, it was necessary for bacteria to be present in the rhizosphere of E. splendens. Inoculated plants supplied with 20 micromol L(-1) CuSO4 had significantly greater concentrations of Cu in shoots and roots than uninoculated plants and bacterial strain MS2 was the most effective strain in promoting plant Cu uptake. There were 2.2-fold and 2.5-fold increases in Cu accumulation in the shoots and roots of plants inoculated with strain MS2 compared to axenic controls. Furthermore, when ampicillin and the bacterial strains were added together to the nutrient solution, the Cu concentrations in roots and shoots of ampicillin-treated plants were lower than those in inoculated plants. When ampicillin was added to the nutrient solution, Cu accumulation was inhibited by about 24-44% in shoots and 20-44% in roots. The above results provided a new insight into the phytoremediation of Cu-contaminated soil. SN - 0160-4120 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16005516/Effect_of_copper_tolerant_rhizosphere_bacteria_on_mobility_of_copper_in_soil_and_copper_accumulation_by_Elsholtzia_splendens_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(05)00114-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -