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Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation and growth during the first 2.5 years of life.

Abstract

Fish oil addition to infant formulas has raised concern on whether increased intake of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3LCPUFA) affects infant growth. The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal fish oil supplementation during 0-4 mo of lactation influences growth in infancy and early childhood. In a randomized, blinded intervention trial, lactating Danish mothers with a fish intake below the population median were randomized to 4.5 g/d fish oil or olive oil. A reference group of 53 mothers with a fish intake in the highest quartile of the population and their infants were included in the study. Head circumference, weight, length, skinfold thickness, and waist circumference of children were measured at 2, 4, and 9 mo and at 2.5 y. One hundred children completed the intervention trial, and 72 were followed up at 2.5 y together with 29 from the reference group. Growth in weight, length, and head circumference did not differ between the randomized groups up to 9 mo, but at 2.5 y, body composition differed significantly. Children in the fish oil group had larger waist circumference body mass index (BMI; 0.6 kg/m(2); p = 0.022), and head circumference compared with those in the olive oil group. Adjusted for sex, ponderal index at birth and current energy intake, BMI at 2.5 y was associated with docosahexaenoic acid in maternal erythrocytes after the intervention. In conclusion, the n-3LCPUFA intake of lactating mothers may be important for growth of young children. The long-term effect on weight and BMI remains to be investigated.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centre for Advanced Food Studies, Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary & Agricultural University, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark. ll@kvl.dk

    , ,

    Source

    Pediatric research 58:2 2005 Aug pg 235-42

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Body Composition
    Body Height
    Body Weight
    Breast Feeding
    Child, Preschool
    Dietary Supplements
    Docosahexaenoic Acids
    Erythrocytes
    Fatty Acids
    Fatty Acids, Omega-3
    Fatty Acids, Unsaturated
    Female
    Fish Oils
    Head
    Humans
    Infant
    Infant, Newborn
    Lactation
    Male
    Milk, Human
    Time Factors
    Triglycerides

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16006428

    Citation

    Lauritzen, Lotte, et al. "Maternal Fish Oil Supplementation in Lactation and Growth During the First 2.5 Years of Life." Pediatric Research, vol. 58, no. 2, 2005, pp. 235-42.
    Lauritzen L, Hoppe C, Straarup EM, et al. Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation and growth during the first 2.5 years of life. Pediatr Res. 2005;58(2):235-42.
    Lauritzen, L., Hoppe, C., Straarup, E. M., & Michaelsen, K. F. (2005). Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation and growth during the first 2.5 years of life. Pediatric Research, 58(2), pp. 235-42.
    Lauritzen L, et al. Maternal Fish Oil Supplementation in Lactation and Growth During the First 2.5 Years of Life. Pediatr Res. 2005;58(2):235-42. PubMed PMID: 16006428.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal fish oil supplementation in lactation and growth during the first 2.5 years of life. AU - Lauritzen,Lotte, AU - Hoppe,Camilla, AU - Straarup,Ellen Marie, AU - Michaelsen,Kim F, Y1 - 2005/07/08/ PY - 2005/7/12/pubmed PY - 2005/11/11/medline PY - 2005/7/12/entrez SP - 235 EP - 42 JF - Pediatric research JO - Pediatr. Res. VL - 58 IS - 2 N2 - Fish oil addition to infant formulas has raised concern on whether increased intake of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3LCPUFA) affects infant growth. The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal fish oil supplementation during 0-4 mo of lactation influences growth in infancy and early childhood. In a randomized, blinded intervention trial, lactating Danish mothers with a fish intake below the population median were randomized to 4.5 g/d fish oil or olive oil. A reference group of 53 mothers with a fish intake in the highest quartile of the population and their infants were included in the study. Head circumference, weight, length, skinfold thickness, and waist circumference of children were measured at 2, 4, and 9 mo and at 2.5 y. One hundred children completed the intervention trial, and 72 were followed up at 2.5 y together with 29 from the reference group. Growth in weight, length, and head circumference did not differ between the randomized groups up to 9 mo, but at 2.5 y, body composition differed significantly. Children in the fish oil group had larger waist circumference body mass index (BMI; 0.6 kg/m(2); p = 0.022), and head circumference compared with those in the olive oil group. Adjusted for sex, ponderal index at birth and current energy intake, BMI at 2.5 y was associated with docosahexaenoic acid in maternal erythrocytes after the intervention. In conclusion, the n-3LCPUFA intake of lactating mothers may be important for growth of young children. The long-term effect on weight and BMI remains to be investigated. SN - 0031-3998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16006428/Maternal_fish_oil_supplementation_in_lactation_and_growth_during_the_first_2_5_years_of_life_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/01.PDR.0000169978.92437.58 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -