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Immune response after influenza vaccination in children with cancer.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess the immune response to inactivated trivalent split influenza vaccine in children with cancer.

PROCEDURES

Forty-four children with various types of malignancies received two doses of influenza vaccine 2-4 weeks apart. Hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) antibody titers were determined in paired sera obtained just before the first vaccination and 4 weeks after the second vaccination.

RESULTS

Influenza vaccine was administered to all children without any serious adverse effects. Protective titer rates (proportion of patients achieving antibody titers > or =40 among those with pre-vaccination titers <40) and response rates (proportion of patients with fourfold or more antibody rise) were 72% and 65% for H1N1, 60% and 40% for H3N2, and 38% and 46% for influenza B, respectively. However, patients on chemotherapy showed a significantly lower immune response to influenza A than those having completed chemotherapy; protection titer rates were 42% versus 90% for H1N1 (P = 0.006) and 25% versus 83% for H3N2 (P = 0.019). For influenza B, patients with low IgG showed a lower response rate than those with high IgG (29% vs. 61%, P = 0.040). Multivariate analysis revealed that factors significantly associated with a lower immune response were low IgG (P < 0.001) and administration of chemotherapy (P = 0.003) for H1N1, administration of chemotherapy (P = 0.008) for H3N2, and low white blood cell (WBC) count (P = 0.030) and low IgG (P = 0.030) for influenza B.

CONCLUSIONS

Influenza vaccination given to children with cancer was safe and induced immune reaction comparable to healthy children, although patients on chemotherapy and/or with chemotherapy-related conditions had a limited ability to produce a sufficient immune response.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Child Health, School of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. matsuzaki@shs.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    , , , ,

    Source

    Pediatric blood & cancer 45:6 2005 Nov pg 831-7

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Antibodies, Viral
    Antibody Formation
    Antineoplastic Agents
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Humans
    Immunoglobulin G
    Infant
    Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
    Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype
    Influenza A virus
    Influenza B virus
    Influenza Vaccines
    Neoplasms
    Vaccination

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16007602

    Citation

    Matsuzaki, Akinobu, et al. "Immune Response After Influenza Vaccination in Children With Cancer." Pediatric Blood & Cancer, vol. 45, no. 6, 2005, pp. 831-7.
    Matsuzaki A, Suminoe A, Koga Y, et al. Immune response after influenza vaccination in children with cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005;45(6):831-7.
    Matsuzaki, A., Suminoe, A., Koga, Y., Kinukawa, N., Kusuhara, K., & Hara, T. (2005). Immune response after influenza vaccination in children with cancer. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 45(6), pp. 831-7.
    Matsuzaki A, et al. Immune Response After Influenza Vaccination in Children With Cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005;45(6):831-7. PubMed PMID: 16007602.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Immune response after influenza vaccination in children with cancer. AU - Matsuzaki,Akinobu, AU - Suminoe,Aiko, AU - Koga,Yuhki, AU - Kinukawa,Naoko, AU - Kusuhara,Koichi, AU - Hara,Toshiro, PY - 2005/7/12/pubmed PY - 2005/12/29/medline PY - 2005/7/12/entrez SP - 831 EP - 7 JF - Pediatric blood & cancer JO - Pediatr Blood Cancer VL - 45 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess the immune response to inactivated trivalent split influenza vaccine in children with cancer. PROCEDURES: Forty-four children with various types of malignancies received two doses of influenza vaccine 2-4 weeks apart. Hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) antibody titers were determined in paired sera obtained just before the first vaccination and 4 weeks after the second vaccination. RESULTS: Influenza vaccine was administered to all children without any serious adverse effects. Protective titer rates (proportion of patients achieving antibody titers > or =40 among those with pre-vaccination titers <40) and response rates (proportion of patients with fourfold or more antibody rise) were 72% and 65% for H1N1, 60% and 40% for H3N2, and 38% and 46% for influenza B, respectively. However, patients on chemotherapy showed a significantly lower immune response to influenza A than those having completed chemotherapy; protection titer rates were 42% versus 90% for H1N1 (P = 0.006) and 25% versus 83% for H3N2 (P = 0.019). For influenza B, patients with low IgG showed a lower response rate than those with high IgG (29% vs. 61%, P = 0.040). Multivariate analysis revealed that factors significantly associated with a lower immune response were low IgG (P < 0.001) and administration of chemotherapy (P = 0.003) for H1N1, administration of chemotherapy (P = 0.008) for H3N2, and low white blood cell (WBC) count (P = 0.030) and low IgG (P = 0.030) for influenza B. CONCLUSIONS: Influenza vaccination given to children with cancer was safe and induced immune reaction comparable to healthy children, although patients on chemotherapy and/or with chemotherapy-related conditions had a limited ability to produce a sufficient immune response. SN - 1545-5009 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16007602/Immune_response_after_influenza_vaccination_in_children_with_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pbc.20470 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -