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Lactation performance of rural Mesoamerindians.
Eur J Clin Nutr 1992; 46(5):337-48EJ

Abstract

Anthropometry, body composition and dietary intake of 30 lactating Otomi Indians of Capulhuac, Mexico, were studied to identify maternal factors which potentially limit lactation and thereby infant growth. Human milk production, milk composition, and maternal dietary intake, body weight, skinfold thicknesses, and body composition were measured at 4 and 6 months postpartum. The 2H2O dose-to-mother method was used to estimate milk production and maternal total body water (TBW). Fat-free mass (FFM) was calculated as TBW/0.73. Body fat was computed as body weight minus FFM. Human milk samples were analyzed for energy, nitrogen, lactose and fat using standard analytical methods. Maternal diet was assessed by three 24-h intake recalls. Mean (SD) milk production was 885 (146) and 869 (150) g/d at 4 and 6 months, respectively. Milk concentrations of protein nitrogen (1.23 (0.17) mg/g) and lactose (66.6 (2.8) mg/g) were comparable to, but the concentrations of fat (22.2 (6.7) mg/g) and energy (0.54 (0.06) kcal/g) were lower than, values observed in economically privileged populations. Maternal height, weight, and BMI were 1.47 (0.06) m, 50.3 (6.0) kg, and 23.4 (3.1) kg/m2, respectively. Maternal TBW, FFM and body fat were 55.8 (4.6)%, 76.4 (6.3)%, and 23.6 (6.4)%, expressed as a percentage of body weight, respectively. Maternal energy and protein intakes averaged 1708 (338) kcal/d and 40 (10) g/d, respectively. Milk production was negatively correlated with maternal body fat (P = 0.006). Energy and fat concentrations in the milk of the Otomi women were positively related to their weight (P = 0.002), BMI (P = 0.05), and body fat (P = 0.004). Energy concentrations in milk were not related to rates of milk production (r = 0.24; P = 0.23). Nor was milk production or composition significantly associated with maternal dietary intake. Lactation performance of these Otomi women correlated significantly with maternal body size and composition, but not current dietary intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division de Crecimiento y Desarrollo, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, DF.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1600932

Citation

Villalpando, S F., et al. "Lactation Performance of Rural Mesoamerindians." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 46, no. 5, 1992, pp. 337-48.
Villalpando SF, Butte NF, Wong WW, et al. Lactation performance of rural Mesoamerindians. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992;46(5):337-48.
Villalpando, S. F., Butte, N. F., Wong, W. W., Flores-Huerta, S., Hernandez-Beltran, M. J., Smith, E. O., & Garza, C. (1992). Lactation performance of rural Mesoamerindians. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 46(5), pp. 337-48.
Villalpando SF, et al. Lactation Performance of Rural Mesoamerindians. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1992;46(5):337-48. PubMed PMID: 1600932.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lactation performance of rural Mesoamerindians. AU - Villalpando,S F, AU - Butte,N F, AU - Wong,W W, AU - Flores-Huerta,S, AU - Hernandez-Beltran,M J, AU - Smith,E O, AU - Garza,C, PY - 1992/5/1/pubmed PY - 1992/5/1/medline PY - 1992/5/1/entrez KW - Americas KW - Anthropometry KW - Biology KW - Body Weight KW - Caloric Intake KW - Cross Sectional Analysis KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diet KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Health KW - Human Milk KW - Indians, North American KW - Indigenous Population KW - Lactation KW - Latin America KW - Lipids KW - Macroeconomic Factors KW - Malnutrition KW - Maternal Physiology KW - Measurement KW - Methodological Studies KW - Mexico KW - North America KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Nutrition Surveys KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Postpartum Women KW - Production KW - Proteins KW - Puerperium KW - Reproduction KW - Research Methodology SP - 337 EP - 48 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 46 IS - 5 N2 - Anthropometry, body composition and dietary intake of 30 lactating Otomi Indians of Capulhuac, Mexico, were studied to identify maternal factors which potentially limit lactation and thereby infant growth. Human milk production, milk composition, and maternal dietary intake, body weight, skinfold thicknesses, and body composition were measured at 4 and 6 months postpartum. The 2H2O dose-to-mother method was used to estimate milk production and maternal total body water (TBW). Fat-free mass (FFM) was calculated as TBW/0.73. Body fat was computed as body weight minus FFM. Human milk samples were analyzed for energy, nitrogen, lactose and fat using standard analytical methods. Maternal diet was assessed by three 24-h intake recalls. Mean (SD) milk production was 885 (146) and 869 (150) g/d at 4 and 6 months, respectively. Milk concentrations of protein nitrogen (1.23 (0.17) mg/g) and lactose (66.6 (2.8) mg/g) were comparable to, but the concentrations of fat (22.2 (6.7) mg/g) and energy (0.54 (0.06) kcal/g) were lower than, values observed in economically privileged populations. Maternal height, weight, and BMI were 1.47 (0.06) m, 50.3 (6.0) kg, and 23.4 (3.1) kg/m2, respectively. Maternal TBW, FFM and body fat were 55.8 (4.6)%, 76.4 (6.3)%, and 23.6 (6.4)%, expressed as a percentage of body weight, respectively. Maternal energy and protein intakes averaged 1708 (338) kcal/d and 40 (10) g/d, respectively. Milk production was negatively correlated with maternal body fat (P = 0.006). Energy and fat concentrations in the milk of the Otomi women were positively related to their weight (P = 0.002), BMI (P = 0.05), and body fat (P = 0.004). Energy concentrations in milk were not related to rates of milk production (r = 0.24; P = 0.23). Nor was milk production or composition significantly associated with maternal dietary intake. Lactation performance of these Otomi women correlated significantly with maternal body size and composition, but not current dietary intake. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1600932/Lactation_performance_of_rural_Mesoamerindians_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/nativeamericanhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -