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Low ankle-brachial index associated with rise in creatinine level over time: results from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.
Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jul 11; 165(13):1481-5.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A low ankle-brachial index (ABI) predicts risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease events, and stroke. However, it is unknown whether a low ABI also predicts a decline in renal function.

METHODS

We examined the association between ABI and change in serum creatinine level over time among 13 655 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study who underwent serum creatinine and ABI measurement at baseline and also underwent serum creatinine measurement 3 years later at the second study visit. The study outcome was a 50% rise in serum creatinine level from baseline to the second study visit.

RESULTS

Overall, 0.48% of participants with an ABI of 1 or higher, 0.9% of participants with an ABI between 0.9 and 0.99, and 2.16% of participants with an ABI lower than 0.9 experienced a 50% or greater increase in serum creatinine level. In multivariate analysis, participants with an ABI lower than 0.9 were still more than twice as likely as those in the referent category (ABI > or = 1) to experience an increase in serum creatinine level (odds ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.7) (P = .04), and a linear trend in the incidence of worsening renal function was noted across ABI categories (P = .02). Analyses excluding participants with renal insufficiency, diabetes, and hypertension at baseline all produced similar results.

CONCLUSION

In addition to known associations of the ABI with stroke, myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease events, and cardiovascular death, a low ABI also predicts an increase in serum creatinine level over time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA. Ann.O'Hare@med.va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16009862

Citation

O'Hare, Ann M., et al. "Low Ankle-brachial Index Associated With Rise in Creatinine Level Over Time: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 165, no. 13, 2005, pp. 1481-5.
O'Hare AM, Rodriguez RA, Bacchetti P. Low ankle-brachial index associated with rise in creatinine level over time: results from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(13):1481-5.
O'Hare, A. M., Rodriguez, R. A., & Bacchetti, P. (2005). Low ankle-brachial index associated with rise in creatinine level over time: results from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Archives of Internal Medicine, 165(13), 1481-5.
O'Hare AM, Rodriguez RA, Bacchetti P. Low Ankle-brachial Index Associated With Rise in Creatinine Level Over Time: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jul 11;165(13):1481-5. PubMed PMID: 16009862.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low ankle-brachial index associated with rise in creatinine level over time: results from the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. AU - O'Hare,Ann M, AU - Rodriguez,Rudolph A, AU - Bacchetti,Peter, PY - 2005/7/13/pubmed PY - 2005/8/27/medline PY - 2005/7/13/entrez SP - 1481 EP - 5 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 165 IS - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: A low ankle-brachial index (ABI) predicts risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease events, and stroke. However, it is unknown whether a low ABI also predicts a decline in renal function. METHODS: We examined the association between ABI and change in serum creatinine level over time among 13 655 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study who underwent serum creatinine and ABI measurement at baseline and also underwent serum creatinine measurement 3 years later at the second study visit. The study outcome was a 50% rise in serum creatinine level from baseline to the second study visit. RESULTS: Overall, 0.48% of participants with an ABI of 1 or higher, 0.9% of participants with an ABI between 0.9 and 0.99, and 2.16% of participants with an ABI lower than 0.9 experienced a 50% or greater increase in serum creatinine level. In multivariate analysis, participants with an ABI lower than 0.9 were still more than twice as likely as those in the referent category (ABI > or = 1) to experience an increase in serum creatinine level (odds ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.7) (P = .04), and a linear trend in the incidence of worsening renal function was noted across ABI categories (P = .02). Analyses excluding participants with renal insufficiency, diabetes, and hypertension at baseline all produced similar results. CONCLUSION: In addition to known associations of the ABI with stroke, myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease events, and cardiovascular death, a low ABI also predicts an increase in serum creatinine level over time. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16009862/Low_ankle_brachial_index_associated_with_rise_in_creatinine_level_over_time:_results_from_the_atherosclerosis_risk_in_communities_study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinte.165.13.1481 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -