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Mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and limbal conjunctival autograft for treating multirecurrent pterygia with symblepharon and motility restriction.
Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2006 Feb; 244(2):232-6.GA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Treatment of eyes with multirecurrent pterygia associated with severe symblepharon and motility restriction is challenging. A combined surgical procedure of intraoperative mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and conjunctival limbal autograft was applied for treating such eyes.

METHODS

Seven eyes of seven patients who had previously undergone an average of four operations for pterygial removal and who manifested recurrent pterygia associated with severe symblepharon and motility restriction were involved in this retrospective study. The surgical procedures involved clearing fibrovascular membrane over the cornea, extensive excision of epibulbar fibrovascular tissue to the bare sclera, application of 0.02% mytomycin C onto the bare sclera for 5 min and transplantation of preserved human amniotic membrane and conjunctival limbal autograft.

RESULTS

Postoperatively, all seven eyes showed rapid epithelialization on the corneal surface in 3-5 days and, on the conjunctival surface, in 10-18 days. For a mean follow-up period of 22.4+/-6.1 months, six eyes recovered deep fornices, smooth and stable ocular surface and full ocular motility without recurrence. One eye showed regrowth of fibrovascular tissue and motility restriction but less severe than before surgery. No complication was noted due to mitomycin C.

CONCLUSIONS

Combined intraoperative mitomycin C, amniotic membrane graft and limbal conjunctival autograft are successful approaches for treating multirecurrent pterygia with severe symblepharon to restore the ocular surface integrity and prevent recurrence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 3 Qinchun Road East, Hangzhou, 310016, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China. yaoyuf@mail.hz.zj.cnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16010553

Citation

Yao, Yu-Feng, et al. "Mitomycin C, Amniotic Membrane Transplantation and Limbal Conjunctival Autograft for Treating Multirecurrent Pterygia With Symblepharon and Motility Restriction." Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht Von Graefes Archiv Fur Klinische Und Experimentelle Ophthalmologie, vol. 244, no. 2, 2006, pp. 232-6.
Yao YF, Qiu WY, Zhang YM, et al. Mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and limbal conjunctival autograft for treating multirecurrent pterygia with symblepharon and motility restriction. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2006;244(2):232-6.
Yao, Y. F., Qiu, W. Y., Zhang, Y. M., & Tseng, S. C. (2006). Mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and limbal conjunctival autograft for treating multirecurrent pterygia with symblepharon and motility restriction. Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht Von Graefes Archiv Fur Klinische Und Experimentelle Ophthalmologie, 244(2), 232-6.
Yao YF, et al. Mitomycin C, Amniotic Membrane Transplantation and Limbal Conjunctival Autograft for Treating Multirecurrent Pterygia With Symblepharon and Motility Restriction. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2006;244(2):232-6. PubMed PMID: 16010553.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and limbal conjunctival autograft for treating multirecurrent pterygia with symblepharon and motility restriction. AU - Yao,Yu-Feng, AU - Qiu,Wen-Ya, AU - Zhang,Yong-Ming, AU - Tseng,Scheffer C G, Y1 - 2005/07/12/ PY - 2005/01/12/received PY - 2005/04/10/accepted PY - 2005/02/18/revised PY - 2005/7/13/pubmed PY - 2007/5/11/medline PY - 2005/7/13/entrez SP - 232 EP - 6 JF - Graefe's archive for clinical and experimental ophthalmology = Albrecht von Graefes Archiv fur klinische und experimentelle Ophthalmologie JO - Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol VL - 244 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Treatment of eyes with multirecurrent pterygia associated with severe symblepharon and motility restriction is challenging. A combined surgical procedure of intraoperative mitomycin C, amniotic membrane transplantation and conjunctival limbal autograft was applied for treating such eyes. METHODS: Seven eyes of seven patients who had previously undergone an average of four operations for pterygial removal and who manifested recurrent pterygia associated with severe symblepharon and motility restriction were involved in this retrospective study. The surgical procedures involved clearing fibrovascular membrane over the cornea, extensive excision of epibulbar fibrovascular tissue to the bare sclera, application of 0.02% mytomycin C onto the bare sclera for 5 min and transplantation of preserved human amniotic membrane and conjunctival limbal autograft. RESULTS: Postoperatively, all seven eyes showed rapid epithelialization on the corneal surface in 3-5 days and, on the conjunctival surface, in 10-18 days. For a mean follow-up period of 22.4+/-6.1 months, six eyes recovered deep fornices, smooth and stable ocular surface and full ocular motility without recurrence. One eye showed regrowth of fibrovascular tissue and motility restriction but less severe than before surgery. No complication was noted due to mitomycin C. CONCLUSIONS: Combined intraoperative mitomycin C, amniotic membrane graft and limbal conjunctival autograft are successful approaches for treating multirecurrent pterygia with severe symblepharon to restore the ocular surface integrity and prevent recurrence. SN - 0721-832X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16010553/Mitomycin_C_amniotic_membrane_transplantation_and_limbal_conjunctival_autograft_for_treating_multirecurrent_pterygia_with_symblepharon_and_motility_restriction_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00417-005-0010-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -