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Prevalence of fasting hypercalciuria associated with increased citraturia in the ambulatory evaluation of nephrolithiasis.
J Nephrol 2005 May-Jun; 18(3):262-6JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nephrolithiasis is a common, high costing pathology of the urinary tract. The most common urinary abnormalities are fasting hypercalciuria, hypercalciuria and hypocitraturia. This study aimed to identify the principal urinary abnormalities in our patients.

METHODS

Ninety-eight patients (pts) (43 females, 55 males) with recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis underwent metabolic evaluation. In two 24-hr urine collections the following parameters were evaluated: calcium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, citrate, oxalate, uric acid, creatinine (Cr), urea, ammonium and pH; blood measurement of calcium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, uric acid, Cr, urea, acid-base balance ionized calcium and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were also performed. A first morning voided urine sample was collected for measuring the urinary cross-links and fasting calciuria. The tubular threshold of phosphate (TmP) was calculated according to Walton and Bijovet. Metabolic evaluation was repeated in 63/98 pts after 7 days on a low calcium diet.

RESULTS

The most common urinary abnormalities were fasting hypercalciuria in 51/96 pts (53.1%), hypercalciuria in 33/97 pts (34%) and hypocitraturia in 29/98 pts (29%); 24/33 pts (73%) with hypercalciuria had fasting hypercalciuria. Hypercalciuria was partially corrected on the calcium-restricted diet, while fasting hypercalciuria was not. Urine citrate levels were significantly higher in patients with fasting hypercalciuria.

CONCLUSIONS

Fasting hypercalciuria was the most frequent urinary abnormality and it was not corrected with a calcium-restricted diet. In fasting hypercalciuric patients, increased bone resorption activity could be responsible for higher citraturia levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, San Martino Hospital, Genoa, Italy. beatrice.damasio@libero.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16013013

Citation

Damasio, Beatrice, et al. "Prevalence of Fasting Hypercalciuria Associated With Increased Citraturia in the Ambulatory Evaluation of Nephrolithiasis." Journal of Nephrology, vol. 18, no. 3, 2005, pp. 262-6.
Damasio B, Massarino F, Durand F, et al. Prevalence of fasting hypercalciuria associated with increased citraturia in the ambulatory evaluation of nephrolithiasis. J Nephrol. 2005;18(3):262-6.
Damasio, B., Massarino, F., Durand, F., Banchero, R., Bottino, P., De Franchis, V., ... Cannella, G. (2005). Prevalence of fasting hypercalciuria associated with increased citraturia in the ambulatory evaluation of nephrolithiasis. Journal of Nephrology, 18(3), pp. 262-6.
Damasio B, et al. Prevalence of Fasting Hypercalciuria Associated With Increased Citraturia in the Ambulatory Evaluation of Nephrolithiasis. J Nephrol. 2005;18(3):262-6. PubMed PMID: 16013013.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of fasting hypercalciuria associated with increased citraturia in the ambulatory evaluation of nephrolithiasis. AU - Damasio,Beatrice, AU - Massarino,Fabio, AU - Durand,Felice, AU - Banchero,Riccardo, AU - Bottino,Paolo, AU - De Franchis,Vincenzina, AU - Carmignani,Giorgio, AU - Cannella,Giuseppe, PY - 2005/7/14/pubmed PY - 2005/10/26/medline PY - 2005/7/14/entrez SP - 262 EP - 6 JF - Journal of nephrology JO - J. Nephrol. VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nephrolithiasis is a common, high costing pathology of the urinary tract. The most common urinary abnormalities are fasting hypercalciuria, hypercalciuria and hypocitraturia. This study aimed to identify the principal urinary abnormalities in our patients. METHODS: Ninety-eight patients (pts) (43 females, 55 males) with recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis underwent metabolic evaluation. In two 24-hr urine collections the following parameters were evaluated: calcium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, citrate, oxalate, uric acid, creatinine (Cr), urea, ammonium and pH; blood measurement of calcium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, uric acid, Cr, urea, acid-base balance ionized calcium and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were also performed. A first morning voided urine sample was collected for measuring the urinary cross-links and fasting calciuria. The tubular threshold of phosphate (TmP) was calculated according to Walton and Bijovet. Metabolic evaluation was repeated in 63/98 pts after 7 days on a low calcium diet. RESULTS: The most common urinary abnormalities were fasting hypercalciuria in 51/96 pts (53.1%), hypercalciuria in 33/97 pts (34%) and hypocitraturia in 29/98 pts (29%); 24/33 pts (73%) with hypercalciuria had fasting hypercalciuria. Hypercalciuria was partially corrected on the calcium-restricted diet, while fasting hypercalciuria was not. Urine citrate levels were significantly higher in patients with fasting hypercalciuria. CONCLUSIONS: Fasting hypercalciuria was the most frequent urinary abnormality and it was not corrected with a calcium-restricted diet. In fasting hypercalciuric patients, increased bone resorption activity could be responsible for higher citraturia levels. SN - 1121-8428 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16013013/Prevalence_of_fasting_hypercalciuria_associated_with_increased_citraturia_in_the_ambulatory_evaluation_of_nephrolithiasis_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=16013013.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -