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Celiac disease: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and nutritional management.
Nutr Clin Care 2005 Apr-Jun; 8(2):54-69NC

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. It is triggered by the gluten proteins of wheat, barley, and rye. All patients express the antigen-presenting molecules human leukocyte antigen-DQ2 (HLA-DQ2) and/or HLA-DQ8, which bind gluten peptides and thus activate destructive intestinal T cells. Patients with untreated CD have circulating IgA autoantibodies to the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (tTG), a component of endomysium. Testing for serum IgA tTG has a high predictive value. Therapy of CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet. Counseling by an expert dietitian and association with a celiac support group are important in helping the patient embark on a healthy gluten-free diet. Current research focuses on non-dietary therapies and treatment of refractory (diet-unresponsive) CD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. dschuppa@bidmc.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16013224

Citation

Schuppan, Detlef, et al. "Celiac Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Nutritional Management." Nutrition in Clinical Care : an Official Publication of Tufts University, vol. 8, no. 2, 2005, pp. 54-69.
Schuppan D, Dennis MD, Kelly CP. Celiac disease: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and nutritional management. Nutr Clin Care. 2005;8(2):54-69.
Schuppan, D., Dennis, M. D., & Kelly, C. P. (2005). Celiac disease: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and nutritional management. Nutrition in Clinical Care : an Official Publication of Tufts University, 8(2), pp. 54-69.
Schuppan D, Dennis MD, Kelly CP. Celiac Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Nutritional Management. Nutr Clin Care. 2005;8(2):54-69. PubMed PMID: 16013224.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Celiac disease: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and nutritional management. AU - Schuppan,Detlef, AU - Dennis,Melinda D, AU - Kelly,Ciaran P, PY - 2005/7/15/pubmed PY - 2005/9/13/medline PY - 2005/7/15/entrez SP - 54 EP - 69 JF - Nutrition in clinical care : an official publication of Tufts University JO - Nutr Clin Care VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. It is triggered by the gluten proteins of wheat, barley, and rye. All patients express the antigen-presenting molecules human leukocyte antigen-DQ2 (HLA-DQ2) and/or HLA-DQ8, which bind gluten peptides and thus activate destructive intestinal T cells. Patients with untreated CD have circulating IgA autoantibodies to the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (tTG), a component of endomysium. Testing for serum IgA tTG has a high predictive value. Therapy of CD is a lifelong gluten-free diet. Counseling by an expert dietitian and association with a celiac support group are important in helping the patient embark on a healthy gluten-free diet. Current research focuses on non-dietary therapies and treatment of refractory (diet-unresponsive) CD. SN - 1096-6781 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16013224/Celiac_disease:_epidemiology_pathogenesis_diagnosis_and_nutritional_management_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/1186 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -