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School tobacco policies in a tobacco-growing state.
J Sch Health. 2005 Aug; 75(6):219-25.JS

Abstract

This study examined factors associated with tobacco-free policies and tobacco cessation in schools serving children in grades 6 to 12 in a tobacco-growing state using a cross-sectional telephone survey of school administrators from public and private middle and high schools (N = 691), representing 117 of the 120 Kentucky counties. Trained health department staff contacted 1028 schools; 691 (67%) participated in a phone survey, which lasted an average of 19 minutes. Variables of interest were indoor and outdoor smoking policies, fund-raising in Bingo halls, provision of cessation and prevention programs, owning or leasing a tobacco base, if the school received money from tobacco companies, type of school (public vs private), and school setting (urban vs rural). Only 20% of Kentucky schools reported comprehensive tobacco-free policies. Urban area schools were nearly twice as likely to have a tobacco-free campus than rural schools. Schools that did fund-raising in smoky Bingo halls were 30% less likely to have tobacco-free school policies. While few schools had a tobacco affiliation, those that received money from tobacco companies or grew tobacco were nearly 3 times as likely to provide cessation resources, compared to schools without tobacco affiliation. Rural schools were less likely to be tobacco free and provide cessation services. School-related, off-campus, extracurricular events might be considered as an element of tobacco-free school policy. Schools with tobacco affiliation may provide more cessation resources due to the increased prevalence of tobacco use in these areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Kentucky College of Nursing and College of Public Health, 40536, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16014128

Citation

Hahn, Ellen J., et al. "School Tobacco Policies in a Tobacco-growing State." The Journal of School Health, vol. 75, no. 6, 2005, pp. 219-25.
Hahn EJ, Rayens MK, Rasnake R, et al. School tobacco policies in a tobacco-growing state. J Sch Health. 2005;75(6):219-25.
Hahn, E. J., Rayens, M. K., Rasnake, R., York, N., Okoli, C. T., & Riker, C. A. (2005). School tobacco policies in a tobacco-growing state. The Journal of School Health, 75(6), 219-25.
Hahn EJ, et al. School Tobacco Policies in a Tobacco-growing State. J Sch Health. 2005;75(6):219-25. PubMed PMID: 16014128.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - School tobacco policies in a tobacco-growing state. AU - Hahn,Ellen J, AU - Rayens,Mary Kay, AU - Rasnake,Rob, AU - York,Nancy, AU - Okoli,Chizimuzo T C, AU - Riker,Carol A, PY - 2005/7/15/pubmed PY - 2006/9/20/medline PY - 2005/7/15/entrez SP - 219 EP - 25 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 75 IS - 6 N2 - This study examined factors associated with tobacco-free policies and tobacco cessation in schools serving children in grades 6 to 12 in a tobacco-growing state using a cross-sectional telephone survey of school administrators from public and private middle and high schools (N = 691), representing 117 of the 120 Kentucky counties. Trained health department staff contacted 1028 schools; 691 (67%) participated in a phone survey, which lasted an average of 19 minutes. Variables of interest were indoor and outdoor smoking policies, fund-raising in Bingo halls, provision of cessation and prevention programs, owning or leasing a tobacco base, if the school received money from tobacco companies, type of school (public vs private), and school setting (urban vs rural). Only 20% of Kentucky schools reported comprehensive tobacco-free policies. Urban area schools were nearly twice as likely to have a tobacco-free campus than rural schools. Schools that did fund-raising in smoky Bingo halls were 30% less likely to have tobacco-free school policies. While few schools had a tobacco affiliation, those that received money from tobacco companies or grew tobacco were nearly 3 times as likely to provide cessation resources, compared to schools without tobacco affiliation. Rural schools were less likely to be tobacco free and provide cessation services. School-related, off-campus, extracurricular events might be considered as an element of tobacco-free school policy. Schools with tobacco affiliation may provide more cessation resources due to the increased prevalence of tobacco use in these areas. SN - 0022-4391 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16014128/School_tobacco_policies_in_a_tobacco_growing_state_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2005.00027.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -