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Dairy fat in cheese raises LDL cholesterol less than that in butter in mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Sep; 59(9):1059-63.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether dairy fat in cheese raises low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as much as in butter, since epidemiology suggests a different impact on cardiovascular disease.

DESIGN

A randomised crossover trial testing the daily consumption of 40 g dairy fat as butter or as matured cheddar cheese, each of 4 weeks duration, was preceded by and separated by 2-week periods when dietary fat was less saturated.

SETTING

Free-living volunteers.

SUBJECTS

A total of 14 men and five women of mean age 56+/-8 y, with mean total cholesterol of 5.6+/-0.8 mmol/l.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Plasma cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triacylglycerol and glucose.

RESULTS

Saturated fat intake was significantly lower during the run-in than during the cheese and butter periods. Mean lipid values did not differ significantly between the cheese and run-in periods, but total cholesterol and LDL-C were significantly higher with butter: total cholesterol (mmol/l): butter 6.1+/-0.7; run-in 5.6+/-0.8 (P < 0.05; ANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment); vs cheese 5.8+/-0.6 (P > 0.05); median LDL-C (mmol/l): butter 3.9 (3.5-4.1) vs run-in 3.4 (3.0-4.1) (P < 0.05; Tukey test); vs cheese 3.7 (3.3-3.9) (P > 0.05). Among 13 subjects whose initial LDL-C was >4 mmol/l, the difference between butter (4.4+/-0.3 mmol/l) and cheese (3.9+/-0.3 mmol/l) was significant (P = 0.014). HDL-C was highest with butter and triacylglycerol with cheese (neither was significant).

CONCLUSION

A total of 40 g dairy fat eaten daily for 4 weeks as butter, but not as cheese, raised total and LDL cholesterol significantly compared with a diet containing significantly less saturated fat. Dietary advice regarding cheese consumption may require modification.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Baker Heart Research Institute (Wynn Domain), Melbourne, Australia. paul.nestel@baker.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16015270

Citation

Nestel, P J., et al. "Dairy Fat in Cheese Raises LDL Cholesterol Less Than That in Butter in Mildly Hypercholesterolaemic Subjects." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 9, 2005, pp. 1059-63.
Nestel PJ, Chronopulos A, Cehun M. Dairy fat in cheese raises LDL cholesterol less than that in butter in mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(9):1059-63.
Nestel, P. J., Chronopulos, A., & Cehun, M. (2005). Dairy fat in cheese raises LDL cholesterol less than that in butter in mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(9), 1059-63.
Nestel PJ, Chronopulos A, Cehun M. Dairy Fat in Cheese Raises LDL Cholesterol Less Than That in Butter in Mildly Hypercholesterolaemic Subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(9):1059-63. PubMed PMID: 16015270.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy fat in cheese raises LDL cholesterol less than that in butter in mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. AU - Nestel,P J, AU - Chronopulos,A, AU - Cehun,M, PY - 2005/7/15/pubmed PY - 2005/12/13/medline PY - 2005/7/15/entrez SP - 1059 EP - 63 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 59 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dairy fat in cheese raises low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as much as in butter, since epidemiology suggests a different impact on cardiovascular disease. DESIGN: A randomised crossover trial testing the daily consumption of 40 g dairy fat as butter or as matured cheddar cheese, each of 4 weeks duration, was preceded by and separated by 2-week periods when dietary fat was less saturated. SETTING: Free-living volunteers. SUBJECTS: A total of 14 men and five women of mean age 56+/-8 y, with mean total cholesterol of 5.6+/-0.8 mmol/l. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Plasma cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), triacylglycerol and glucose. RESULTS: Saturated fat intake was significantly lower during the run-in than during the cheese and butter periods. Mean lipid values did not differ significantly between the cheese and run-in periods, but total cholesterol and LDL-C were significantly higher with butter: total cholesterol (mmol/l): butter 6.1+/-0.7; run-in 5.6+/-0.8 (P < 0.05; ANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment); vs cheese 5.8+/-0.6 (P > 0.05); median LDL-C (mmol/l): butter 3.9 (3.5-4.1) vs run-in 3.4 (3.0-4.1) (P < 0.05; Tukey test); vs cheese 3.7 (3.3-3.9) (P > 0.05). Among 13 subjects whose initial LDL-C was >4 mmol/l, the difference between butter (4.4+/-0.3 mmol/l) and cheese (3.9+/-0.3 mmol/l) was significant (P = 0.014). HDL-C was highest with butter and triacylglycerol with cheese (neither was significant). CONCLUSION: A total of 40 g dairy fat eaten daily for 4 weeks as butter, but not as cheese, raised total and LDL cholesterol significantly compared with a diet containing significantly less saturated fat. Dietary advice regarding cheese consumption may require modification. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16015270/Dairy_fat_in_cheese_raises_LDL_cholesterol_less_than_that_in_butter_in_mildly_hypercholesterolaemic_subjects_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602211 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -