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Dietary fat intake and early mortality patterns--data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.
J Intern Med. 2005 Aug; 258(2):153-65.JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Most current dietary guidelines encourage limiting relative fat intake to <30% of total daily energy, with saturated and trans fatty acids contributing no more than 10%. We examined whether total fat intake, saturated fat, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat intake are independent risk factors for prospective all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality.

DESIGN

Population-based, prospective cohort study.

SETTING AND SUBJECTS

The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study was set in the city of Malmö, southern Sweden. A total of 28,098 middle-aged individuals participated in the study 1991-1996.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Subjects were categorized by quartiles of relative fat intake, with the first quartile used as a reference point in estimating multivariate relative risks (RR; 95% CI, Cox's regression model). Adjustments were made for confounding by age and various lifestyle factors.

RESULTS

Women in the fourth quartile of total fat intake had a significantly higher RR of cancer mortality (RR 1.46; CI 1.04-2.04). A significant downwards trend was observed for cardiovascular mortality amongst men from the first to the fourth quartile (P=0.028). No deteriorating effects of high saturated fat intake were observed for either sex for any cause of death. Beneficial effects of a relatively high intake of unsaturated fats were not uniform.

CONCLUSIONS

With the exception of cancer mortality for women, individuals receiving more than 30% of their total daily energy from fat and more than 10% from saturated fat, did not have increased mortality. Current dietary guidelines concerning fat intake are thus generally not supported by our observational results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Lund University, University Hospital (UMAS), Malmö, Sweden. margret.leosdottir@med.lu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16018792

Citation

Leosdottir, M, et al. "Dietary Fat Intake and Early Mortality Patterns--data From the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study." Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 258, no. 2, 2005, pp. 153-65.
Leosdottir M, Nilsson PM, Nilsson JA, et al. Dietary fat intake and early mortality patterns--data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. J Intern Med. 2005;258(2):153-65.
Leosdottir, M., Nilsson, P. M., Nilsson, J. A., Månsson, H., & Berglund, G. (2005). Dietary fat intake and early mortality patterns--data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Journal of Internal Medicine, 258(2), 153-65.
Leosdottir M, et al. Dietary Fat Intake and Early Mortality Patterns--data From the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. J Intern Med. 2005;258(2):153-65. PubMed PMID: 16018792.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat intake and early mortality patterns--data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. AU - Leosdottir,M, AU - Nilsson,P M, AU - Nilsson,J-A, AU - Månsson,H, AU - Berglund,G, PY - 2005/7/16/pubmed PY - 2005/8/16/medline PY - 2005/7/16/entrez SP - 153 EP - 65 JF - Journal of internal medicine JO - J. Intern. Med. VL - 258 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Most current dietary guidelines encourage limiting relative fat intake to <30% of total daily energy, with saturated and trans fatty acids contributing no more than 10%. We examined whether total fat intake, saturated fat, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat intake are independent risk factors for prospective all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. DESIGN: Population-based, prospective cohort study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study was set in the city of Malmö, southern Sweden. A total of 28,098 middle-aged individuals participated in the study 1991-1996. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjects were categorized by quartiles of relative fat intake, with the first quartile used as a reference point in estimating multivariate relative risks (RR; 95% CI, Cox's regression model). Adjustments were made for confounding by age and various lifestyle factors. RESULTS: Women in the fourth quartile of total fat intake had a significantly higher RR of cancer mortality (RR 1.46; CI 1.04-2.04). A significant downwards trend was observed for cardiovascular mortality amongst men from the first to the fourth quartile (P=0.028). No deteriorating effects of high saturated fat intake were observed for either sex for any cause of death. Beneficial effects of a relatively high intake of unsaturated fats were not uniform. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of cancer mortality for women, individuals receiving more than 30% of their total daily energy from fat and more than 10% from saturated fat, did not have increased mortality. Current dietary guidelines concerning fat intake are thus generally not supported by our observational results. SN - 0954-6820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16018792/Dietary_fat_intake_and_early_mortality_patterns__data_from_The_Malmö_Diet_and_Cancer_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2005.01520.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -