Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A comparison of bone mineral density in oligomenorrhoeic adolescents with polycystic ovaries and normal ovaries.
Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005 May; 20(5):237-42.GE

Abstract

We evaluated whether the presence of polycystic ovaries in adolescent girls as a cause of oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea would pose any protective effect against osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (BMD) compared with girls having similar menstrual dysfunction but normal ovaries. A cross-sectional observational study was done in consecutive girls, aged between 16 and 19 years, presenting to the adolescent gynaecology clinic with oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea. All patients underwent full hormonal profile assessment, pelvic ultrasound for ovarian morphology, bio-impedance estimation of body fat, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative peripheral computed tomography scans to determine BMD in axial and appendicular skeletal sites. Polycystic ovaries were diagnosed according to ultrasound morphology. These were then compared with an age-matched eumenorrhoeic control group that had undergone the same evaluation. Of 45 patients with oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea, 14 (31%) were diagnosed to have polycystic ovaries, while the other 31 had normal ovaries. The control group consisted of 45 age-matched eumenorrhoeic girls. The group with normal ovaries had lower BMD at the lumbar spine and hip, as well as lower total tibial volumetric BMD, than the eumenorrhoeic controls, but there were no significant differences between the group with polycystic ovaries and eumenorrhoeic controls. We conclude that adolescents with oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea with normal ovaries had lower BMD than eumenorrhoeic ones, but those with polycystic ovaries had BMD values comparable to those of eumenorrhoeic controls despite their menstrual dysfunction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, United Christian Hospital, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR. towkw@ha.org.hkNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16019367

Citation

To, William W K., and Margaret W N. Wong. "A Comparison of Bone Mineral Density in Oligomenorrhoeic Adolescents With Polycystic Ovaries and Normal Ovaries." Gynecological Endocrinology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, vol. 20, no. 5, 2005, pp. 237-42.
To WW, Wong M. A comparison of bone mineral density in oligomenorrhoeic adolescents with polycystic ovaries and normal ovaries. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005;20(5):237-42.
To, W. W., & Wong, M. (2005). A comparison of bone mineral density in oligomenorrhoeic adolescents with polycystic ovaries and normal ovaries. Gynecological Endocrinology : the Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology, 20(5), 237-42.
To WW, Wong M. A Comparison of Bone Mineral Density in Oligomenorrhoeic Adolescents With Polycystic Ovaries and Normal Ovaries. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2005;20(5):237-42. PubMed PMID: 16019367.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparison of bone mineral density in oligomenorrhoeic adolescents with polycystic ovaries and normal ovaries. AU - To,William W K, AU - Wong,Margaret W N, PY - 2005/7/16/pubmed PY - 2005/10/21/medline PY - 2005/7/16/entrez SP - 237 EP - 42 JF - Gynecological endocrinology : the official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology JO - Gynecol Endocrinol VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - We evaluated whether the presence of polycystic ovaries in adolescent girls as a cause of oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea would pose any protective effect against osteoporosis or low bone mineral density (BMD) compared with girls having similar menstrual dysfunction but normal ovaries. A cross-sectional observational study was done in consecutive girls, aged between 16 and 19 years, presenting to the adolescent gynaecology clinic with oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea. All patients underwent full hormonal profile assessment, pelvic ultrasound for ovarian morphology, bio-impedance estimation of body fat, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative peripheral computed tomography scans to determine BMD in axial and appendicular skeletal sites. Polycystic ovaries were diagnosed according to ultrasound morphology. These were then compared with an age-matched eumenorrhoeic control group that had undergone the same evaluation. Of 45 patients with oligomenorrhoea or amenorrhoea, 14 (31%) were diagnosed to have polycystic ovaries, while the other 31 had normal ovaries. The control group consisted of 45 age-matched eumenorrhoeic girls. The group with normal ovaries had lower BMD at the lumbar spine and hip, as well as lower total tibial volumetric BMD, than the eumenorrhoeic controls, but there were no significant differences between the group with polycystic ovaries and eumenorrhoeic controls. We conclude that adolescents with oligomenorrhoea and amenorrhoea with normal ovaries had lower BMD than eumenorrhoeic ones, but those with polycystic ovaries had BMD values comparable to those of eumenorrhoeic controls despite their menstrual dysfunction. SN - 0951-3590 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16019367/A_comparison_of_bone_mineral_density_in_oligomenorrhoeic_adolescents_with_polycystic_ovaries_and_normal_ovaries_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09513590500097200 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -