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Rapamycin pre-treatment preserves viability, ATP level and catabolic capacity during carbon starvation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Yeast. 2005 Jun; 22(8):615-23.Y

Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing exponentially in anaerobic batch cultures that are suddenly exposed to carbon starvation will rapidly lose almost all ATP. This will cause an energy deficiency and adaptation to starvation conditions is prohibited. As a result, viability and fermentative capacity will be drastically reduced during prolonged starvation. However, if the cells are incubated in the presence of rapamycin (which will inactivate the TOR pathway) before carbon starvation ATP levels, viability and fermentative capacity will be preserved to a much larger extent compared to untreated cells. The beneficial effect of rapamycin cannot be explained by induction of a stationary phase phenotype. In fact, under these anaerobic well-controlled growth conditions, rapamycin-treated cells were still metabolically active and continued to grow, albeit not exponentially and with a reduced protein content. It is hypothesized that the loss of ATP during carbon starvation occurs because protein synthesis does not make an immediate arrest at the onset of starvation. Since there are no external or internal energy sources, this will rapidly deplete the cells of ATP. Rapamycin-treated cells, on the other hand, have already downregulated the protein-synthesizing machinery and are thus better suited to cope with a sudden carbon starvation condition. This hypothesis is strengthened by the fact that treating the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide also improves the carbon starvation tolerance, although not to the same extent as rapamycin. The even better effect of rapamycin is explained by accumulation of storage carbohydrates, which is not observed for cycloheximide-treated cells.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemistry and Bioscience, Lundberg Laboratory, Chalmers University of Technology, Box 462, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16034823

Citation

Thomsson, Elisabeth, et al. "Rapamycin Pre-treatment Preserves Viability, ATP Level and Catabolic Capacity During Carbon Starvation of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae." Yeast (Chichester, England), vol. 22, no. 8, 2005, pp. 615-23.
Thomsson E, Svensson M, Larsson C. Rapamycin pre-treatment preserves viability, ATP level and catabolic capacity during carbon starvation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast. 2005;22(8):615-23.
Thomsson, E., Svensson, M., & Larsson, C. (2005). Rapamycin pre-treatment preserves viability, ATP level and catabolic capacity during carbon starvation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast (Chichester, England), 22(8), 615-23.
Thomsson E, Svensson M, Larsson C. Rapamycin Pre-treatment Preserves Viability, ATP Level and Catabolic Capacity During Carbon Starvation of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. Yeast. 2005;22(8):615-23. PubMed PMID: 16034823.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rapamycin pre-treatment preserves viability, ATP level and catabolic capacity during carbon starvation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. AU - Thomsson,Elisabeth, AU - Svensson,Maria, AU - Larsson,Christer, PY - 2005/7/22/pubmed PY - 2005/10/12/medline PY - 2005/7/22/entrez SP - 615 EP - 23 JF - Yeast (Chichester, England) JO - Yeast VL - 22 IS - 8 N2 - Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing exponentially in anaerobic batch cultures that are suddenly exposed to carbon starvation will rapidly lose almost all ATP. This will cause an energy deficiency and adaptation to starvation conditions is prohibited. As a result, viability and fermentative capacity will be drastically reduced during prolonged starvation. However, if the cells are incubated in the presence of rapamycin (which will inactivate the TOR pathway) before carbon starvation ATP levels, viability and fermentative capacity will be preserved to a much larger extent compared to untreated cells. The beneficial effect of rapamycin cannot be explained by induction of a stationary phase phenotype. In fact, under these anaerobic well-controlled growth conditions, rapamycin-treated cells were still metabolically active and continued to grow, albeit not exponentially and with a reduced protein content. It is hypothesized that the loss of ATP during carbon starvation occurs because protein synthesis does not make an immediate arrest at the onset of starvation. Since there are no external or internal energy sources, this will rapidly deplete the cells of ATP. Rapamycin-treated cells, on the other hand, have already downregulated the protein-synthesizing machinery and are thus better suited to cope with a sudden carbon starvation condition. This hypothesis is strengthened by the fact that treating the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide also improves the carbon starvation tolerance, although not to the same extent as rapamycin. The even better effect of rapamycin is explained by accumulation of storage carbohydrates, which is not observed for cycloheximide-treated cells. SN - 0749-503X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16034823/Rapamycin_pre_treatment_preserves_viability_ATP_level_and_catabolic_capacity_during_carbon_starvation_of_Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/yea.1219 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -