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Clinical relevance of small-bowel findings detected by wireless capsule endoscopy.
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jun; 40(6):725-33.SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Capsule endoscopy is becoming known as a valid tool for identifying sources of obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Fewer data are available about its clinical value for other indications.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Sixty patients (31 F, mean age 47 years, range 14-80 years) with no signs of overt GI bleeding were investigated by Given M2A video capsule for suspected small-bowel disease. The main clinical features were: iron deficient anemia (20), abdominal pain (12), chronic diarrhea (9), malabsorption and weight loss (7), Crohn's disease (CD) (5), and familial adenomatous polyposis (3). Three patients underwent wireless endoscopy for suspected GI neoplasm and one for portal thrombosis.

RESULTS

Complete vision of the small bowel was achieved in 55 patients. No small-bowel lesions were identified in 17 patients, but 5 of them had gastric abnormalities. Small-bowel abnormality was found in 38 patients. Lesions compatible with CD were found in 14 patients, diffuse or patchy enteropathy in 7 and polyps in 6. Actively bleeding lesions were detected in 6 patients and potential bleeding sources in 5. Capsule endoscopy had an overall diagnostic yield of 62%. In particular, three small-bowel malignancies were detected and 9 patients received a better definition of their already-known pathology. However, further endoscopies were needed in 10 patients to obtain a diagnosis. One patient, diagnosed with ileal CD, underwent surgery, as the capsule remained trapped in a stricture.

CONCLUSIONS

Wireless endoscopy effectively visualizes small-bowel abnormalities even though more accurate selection of the patients is needed in order to optimize its diagnostic efficacy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgical and Gastroenterological Sciences, Gastroenterology Section, universityof Padua, Italy. gc.sturniolo@unipd.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16036534

Citation

Sturniolo, Giacomo C., et al. "Clinical Relevance of Small-bowel Findings Detected By Wireless Capsule Endoscopy." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 40, no. 6, 2005, pp. 725-33.
Sturniolo GC, Di Leo V, Vettorato MG, et al. Clinical relevance of small-bowel findings detected by wireless capsule endoscopy. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005;40(6):725-33.
Sturniolo, G. C., Di Leo, V., Vettorato, M. G., & D'Inca, R. (2005). Clinical relevance of small-bowel findings detected by wireless capsule endoscopy. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 40(6), 725-33.
Sturniolo GC, et al. Clinical Relevance of Small-bowel Findings Detected By Wireless Capsule Endoscopy. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2005;40(6):725-33. PubMed PMID: 16036534.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical relevance of small-bowel findings detected by wireless capsule endoscopy. AU - Sturniolo,Giacomo C, AU - Di Leo,Vincenza, AU - Vettorato,Maria G, AU - D'Inca,Renata, PY - 2005/7/23/pubmed PY - 2005/9/1/medline PY - 2005/7/23/entrez SP - 725 EP - 33 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand J Gastroenterol VL - 40 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Capsule endoscopy is becoming known as a valid tool for identifying sources of obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Fewer data are available about its clinical value for other indications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty patients (31 F, mean age 47 years, range 14-80 years) with no signs of overt GI bleeding were investigated by Given M2A video capsule for suspected small-bowel disease. The main clinical features were: iron deficient anemia (20), abdominal pain (12), chronic diarrhea (9), malabsorption and weight loss (7), Crohn's disease (CD) (5), and familial adenomatous polyposis (3). Three patients underwent wireless endoscopy for suspected GI neoplasm and one for portal thrombosis. RESULTS: Complete vision of the small bowel was achieved in 55 patients. No small-bowel lesions were identified in 17 patients, but 5 of them had gastric abnormalities. Small-bowel abnormality was found in 38 patients. Lesions compatible with CD were found in 14 patients, diffuse or patchy enteropathy in 7 and polyps in 6. Actively bleeding lesions were detected in 6 patients and potential bleeding sources in 5. Capsule endoscopy had an overall diagnostic yield of 62%. In particular, three small-bowel malignancies were detected and 9 patients received a better definition of their already-known pathology. However, further endoscopies were needed in 10 patients to obtain a diagnosis. One patient, diagnosed with ileal CD, underwent surgery, as the capsule remained trapped in a stricture. CONCLUSIONS: Wireless endoscopy effectively visualizes small-bowel abnormalities even though more accurate selection of the patients is needed in order to optimize its diagnostic efficacy. SN - 0036-5521 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16036534/Clinical_relevance_of_small_bowel_findings_detected_by_wireless_capsule_endoscopy_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00365520510015511 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -