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Hot flushes during the menopause transition: a longitudinal study in Australian-born women.
Menopause. 2005 Jul-Aug; 12(4):460-7.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate factors associated with the presence, severity, and frequency of hot flushes.

DESIGN

A 9-year prospective study of 438 Australian-born women, aged 45 to 55 years and menstruating at baseline. Annual fasting blood collection, physical measurements, and interviews including questions about bothersome hot flushes in previous 2 weeks were performed. A "hot flush index" score was calculated from the product of the severity and frequency data. Data were analyzed using random-effects time-series regression models.

RESULTS

A total of 381 women supplied complete data over the follow-up years. A total of 350 women experienced the menopause transition, of whom 60 (17%) never reported bothersome hot flushes. At baseline, women who reported hot flushes were significantly more likely to have higher negative moods, not be in full- or part-time paid work, smoke, and not report exercising every day. Over the 9-year period of the study, variables significantly associated with reporting bothersome hot flushes were relatively young age (P < 0.001), low exercise levels (P < 0.05), low estradiol levels (P < 0.001), high follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels (P < 0.001), smoking (P < 0.01), being in the late menopause transition (P < 0.001), or being postmenopausal (P < 0.001). In women reporting hot flushes, the hot flush index score increased as their FSH levels increased (P < 0.01), as they entered the late stage of the menopause transition (P < 0.001), and as they became postmenopausal (P < 0.05), and decreased with as their age (P < 0.001) and exercise level (P < 0.05) increased. Between-women analyses found that the hot flush index score was greater in women with higher average FSH levels over time (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Menopause status, FSH and estradiol levels, age, exercise level, and smoking status all contributed to the experience of bothersome hot flushes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office for Gender and Health, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. janetrg@unimelb.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16037762

Citation

Guthrie, Janet R., et al. "Hot Flushes During the Menopause Transition: a Longitudinal Study in Australian-born Women." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), vol. 12, no. 4, 2005, pp. 460-7.
Guthrie JR, Dennerstein L, Taffe JR, et al. Hot flushes during the menopause transition: a longitudinal study in Australian-born women. Menopause. 2005;12(4):460-7.
Guthrie, J. R., Dennerstein, L., Taffe, J. R., Lehert, P., & Burger, H. G. (2005). Hot flushes during the menopause transition: a longitudinal study in Australian-born women. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 12(4), 460-7.
Guthrie JR, et al. Hot Flushes During the Menopause Transition: a Longitudinal Study in Australian-born Women. Menopause. 2005 Jul-Aug;12(4):460-7. PubMed PMID: 16037762.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hot flushes during the menopause transition: a longitudinal study in Australian-born women. AU - Guthrie,Janet R, AU - Dennerstein,Lorraine, AU - Taffe,John R, AU - Lehert,Philippe, AU - Burger,Henry G, Y1 - 2005/07/21/ PY - 2004/08/04/received PY - 2004/11/02/revised PY - 2004/11/02/accepted PY - 2005/7/23/pubmed PY - 2005/12/15/medline PY - 2005/7/23/entrez SP - 460 EP - 7 JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with the presence, severity, and frequency of hot flushes. DESIGN: A 9-year prospective study of 438 Australian-born women, aged 45 to 55 years and menstruating at baseline. Annual fasting blood collection, physical measurements, and interviews including questions about bothersome hot flushes in previous 2 weeks were performed. A "hot flush index" score was calculated from the product of the severity and frequency data. Data were analyzed using random-effects time-series regression models. RESULTS: A total of 381 women supplied complete data over the follow-up years. A total of 350 women experienced the menopause transition, of whom 60 (17%) never reported bothersome hot flushes. At baseline, women who reported hot flushes were significantly more likely to have higher negative moods, not be in full- or part-time paid work, smoke, and not report exercising every day. Over the 9-year period of the study, variables significantly associated with reporting bothersome hot flushes were relatively young age (P < 0.001), low exercise levels (P < 0.05), low estradiol levels (P < 0.001), high follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels (P < 0.001), smoking (P < 0.01), being in the late menopause transition (P < 0.001), or being postmenopausal (P < 0.001). In women reporting hot flushes, the hot flush index score increased as their FSH levels increased (P < 0.01), as they entered the late stage of the menopause transition (P < 0.001), and as they became postmenopausal (P < 0.05), and decreased with as their age (P < 0.001) and exercise level (P < 0.05) increased. Between-women analyses found that the hot flush index score was greater in women with higher average FSH levels over time (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Menopause status, FSH and estradiol levels, age, exercise level, and smoking status all contributed to the experience of bothersome hot flushes. SN - 1072-3714 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16037762/Hot_flushes_during_the_menopause_transition:_a_longitudinal_study_in_Australian_born_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.GME.0000155200.80687.BE DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -