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Knowledge and attitudes about intimate partner violence among immigrant Latinos in rural North Carolina: baseline information and implications for outreach.
Violence Against Women. 2005 Mar; 11(3):337-52.VA

Abstract

To create appropriate intimate partner violence (IPV) services for Latino immigrants, practitioners must be aware of their needs. We conducted interviews with 100 recent Latino immigrants in a rural North Carolina county. Overall, IPV was not perceived to be a problem; however, men and women differed in their perceptions. Men were more likely to agree with IPV myths, and both men and women felt that IPV had a detrimental impact on children. Many did not know about the local domestic violence agency, and knowledge about protective orders was limited. Outreach should emphasize the seriousness of IPV, adapt content for gender-specific audiences, and increase awareness about local resources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16043553

Citation

Moracco, Kathryn E., et al. "Knowledge and Attitudes About Intimate Partner Violence Among Immigrant Latinos in Rural North Carolina: Baseline Information and Implications for Outreach." Violence Against Women, vol. 11, no. 3, 2005, pp. 337-52.
Moracco KE, Hilton A, Hodges KG, et al. Knowledge and attitudes about intimate partner violence among immigrant Latinos in rural North Carolina: baseline information and implications for outreach. Violence Against Women. 2005;11(3):337-52.
Moracco, K. E., Hilton, A., Hodges, K. G., & Frasier, P. Y. (2005). Knowledge and attitudes about intimate partner violence among immigrant Latinos in rural North Carolina: baseline information and implications for outreach. Violence Against Women, 11(3), 337-52.
Moracco KE, et al. Knowledge and Attitudes About Intimate Partner Violence Among Immigrant Latinos in Rural North Carolina: Baseline Information and Implications for Outreach. Violence Against Women. 2005;11(3):337-52. PubMed PMID: 16043553.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge and attitudes about intimate partner violence among immigrant Latinos in rural North Carolina: baseline information and implications for outreach. AU - Moracco,Kathryn E, AU - Hilton,Alison, AU - Hodges,Kathryn G, AU - Frasier,Pamela Y, PY - 2005/7/27/pubmed PY - 2005/9/24/medline PY - 2005/7/27/entrez SP - 337 EP - 52 JF - Violence against women JO - Violence Against Women VL - 11 IS - 3 N2 - To create appropriate intimate partner violence (IPV) services for Latino immigrants, practitioners must be aware of their needs. We conducted interviews with 100 recent Latino immigrants in a rural North Carolina county. Overall, IPV was not perceived to be a problem; however, men and women differed in their perceptions. Men were more likely to agree with IPV myths, and both men and women felt that IPV had a detrimental impact on children. Many did not know about the local domestic violence agency, and knowledge about protective orders was limited. Outreach should emphasize the seriousness of IPV, adapt content for gender-specific audiences, and increase awareness about local resources. SN - 1077-8012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16043553/Knowledge_and_attitudes_about_intimate_partner_violence_among_immigrant_Latinos_in_rural_North_Carolina:_baseline_information_and_implications_for_outreach_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1077801204273296?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -