Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cooling methods used in the treatment of exertional heat illness.
Br J Sports Med. 2005 Aug; 39(8):503-7; discussion 507.BJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To review the different methods of reducing body core temperature in patients with exertional heatstroke.

METHODS

The search strategy included articles from 1966 to July 2003 using the databases Medline and Premedline, Embase, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) reviews, SPORTDiscus, and cross referencing the bibliographies of relevant papers. Studies were included if they contained original data on cooling times or cooling rates in patients with heat illness or normal subjects who were subjected to heat stress.

RESULTS

In total, 17 papers were included in the analysis. From the evidence currently available, the most effective method of reducing body core temperature appears to be immersion in iced water, although the practicalities of this treatment may limit its use. Other methods include both evaporative and invasive techniques, and the use of chemical agents such as dantrolene.

CONCLUSIONS

The main predictor of outcome in exertional heatstroke is the duration and degree of hyperthermia. Where possible, patients should be cooled using iced water immersion, but, if this is not possible, a combination of other techniques may be used to facilitate rapid cooling. There is no evidence to support the use of dantrolene in these patients. Further work should include a randomised trial comparing immersion and evaporative therapy in heatstroke patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emergency Department, Derriford Hospital, 4 Fort Terrace, Plymouth PL6 5BU, UK. jasonesmith@doctors.org.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16046331

Citation

Smith, J E.. "Cooling Methods Used in the Treatment of Exertional Heat Illness." British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 39, no. 8, 2005, pp. 503-7; discussion 507.
Smith JE. Cooling methods used in the treatment of exertional heat illness. Br J Sports Med. 2005;39(8):503-7; discussion 507.
Smith, J. E. (2005). Cooling methods used in the treatment of exertional heat illness. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 39(8), 503-7; discussion 507.
Smith JE. Cooling Methods Used in the Treatment of Exertional Heat Illness. Br J Sports Med. 2005;39(8):503-7; discussion 507. PubMed PMID: 16046331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cooling methods used in the treatment of exertional heat illness. A1 - Smith,J E, PY - 2005/7/28/pubmed PY - 2005/8/16/medline PY - 2005/7/28/entrez SP - 503-7; discussion 507 JF - British journal of sports medicine JO - Br J Sports Med VL - 39 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review the different methods of reducing body core temperature in patients with exertional heatstroke. METHODS: The search strategy included articles from 1966 to July 2003 using the databases Medline and Premedline, Embase, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) reviews, SPORTDiscus, and cross referencing the bibliographies of relevant papers. Studies were included if they contained original data on cooling times or cooling rates in patients with heat illness or normal subjects who were subjected to heat stress. RESULTS: In total, 17 papers were included in the analysis. From the evidence currently available, the most effective method of reducing body core temperature appears to be immersion in iced water, although the practicalities of this treatment may limit its use. Other methods include both evaporative and invasive techniques, and the use of chemical agents such as dantrolene. CONCLUSIONS: The main predictor of outcome in exertional heatstroke is the duration and degree of hyperthermia. Where possible, patients should be cooled using iced water immersion, but, if this is not possible, a combination of other techniques may be used to facilitate rapid cooling. There is no evidence to support the use of dantrolene in these patients. Further work should include a randomised trial comparing immersion and evaporative therapy in heatstroke patients. SN - 1473-0480 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16046331/Cooling_methods_used_in_the_treatment_of_exertional_heat_illness_ L2 - http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16046331 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -