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Changes in hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke following the implementation of New York's smoke-free law.
Tob Control. 2005 Aug; 14(4):236-41.TC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the impact on hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke of New York's smoke-free law that prohibits smoking in all places of employment, including restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities.

DESIGN

Pre-post longitudinal follow up design.

SETTINGS

Restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities in New York State.

SUBJECTS

At baseline, 104 non-smoking workers in restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities were recruited with newspaper ads, flyers, and radio announcements. Of these, 68 completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen at baseline. At three, six, and 12 month follow up studies, 47, 38, and 32 workers from the baseline sample of 68 completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen.

INTERVENTION

The smoke-free law went into effect 24 July 2003.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Self reported sensory and respiratory symptoms and exposure to secondhand smoke; self administered saliva cotinine specimens. Analyses were limited to subjects in all four study periods who completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen.

RESULTS

All analyses were limited to participants who completed both an interview and a saliva specimen for all waves of data collection (n = 30) and who had cotinine concentrations < or = 15 ng/ml (n = 24). Hours of exposure to secondhand smoke in hospitality jobs decreased from 12.1 hours (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.0 to 16.3 hours) to 0.2 hours (95% CI -0.1 to 0.5 hours) (p < 0.01) and saliva cotinine concentration decreased from 3.6 ng/ml (95% CI 2.6 to 4.7 ng/ml) to 0.8 ng/ml (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2 ng/ml) (p < 0.01) from baseline to the 12 month follow up. The prevalence of workers reporting sensory symptoms declined from 88% (95% CI 66% to 96%) to 38% (95% CI 20% to 59%) (p < 0.01); there was no change in the overall prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms (p < 0.16).

CONCLUSION

New York's smoke-free law had its intended effect of protecting hospitality workers from exposure to secondhand smoke within three months of implementation. One year after implementation, the results suggest continued compliance with the law.

Authors+Show Affiliations

RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA. mcf@rti.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16046685

Citation

Farrelly, M C., et al. "Changes in Hospitality Workers' Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Following the Implementation of New York's Smoke-free Law." Tobacco Control, vol. 14, no. 4, 2005, pp. 236-41.
Farrelly MC, Nonnemaker JM, Chou R, et al. Changes in hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke following the implementation of New York's smoke-free law. Tob Control. 2005;14(4):236-41.
Farrelly, M. C., Nonnemaker, J. M., Chou, R., Hyland, A., Peterson, K. K., & Bauer, U. E. (2005). Changes in hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke following the implementation of New York's smoke-free law. Tobacco Control, 14(4), 236-41.
Farrelly MC, et al. Changes in Hospitality Workers' Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Following the Implementation of New York's Smoke-free Law. Tob Control. 2005;14(4):236-41. PubMed PMID: 16046685.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke following the implementation of New York's smoke-free law. AU - Farrelly,M C, AU - Nonnemaker,J M, AU - Chou,R, AU - Hyland,A, AU - Peterson,K K, AU - Bauer,U E, PY - 2005/7/28/pubmed PY - 2005/10/19/medline PY - 2005/7/28/entrez SP - 236 EP - 41 JF - Tobacco control JO - Tob Control VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact on hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke of New York's smoke-free law that prohibits smoking in all places of employment, including restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities. DESIGN: Pre-post longitudinal follow up design. SETTINGS: Restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities in New York State. SUBJECTS: At baseline, 104 non-smoking workers in restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities were recruited with newspaper ads, flyers, and radio announcements. Of these, 68 completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen at baseline. At three, six, and 12 month follow up studies, 47, 38, and 32 workers from the baseline sample of 68 completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen. INTERVENTION: The smoke-free law went into effect 24 July 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self reported sensory and respiratory symptoms and exposure to secondhand smoke; self administered saliva cotinine specimens. Analyses were limited to subjects in all four study periods who completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen. RESULTS: All analyses were limited to participants who completed both an interview and a saliva specimen for all waves of data collection (n = 30) and who had cotinine concentrations < or = 15 ng/ml (n = 24). Hours of exposure to secondhand smoke in hospitality jobs decreased from 12.1 hours (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.0 to 16.3 hours) to 0.2 hours (95% CI -0.1 to 0.5 hours) (p < 0.01) and saliva cotinine concentration decreased from 3.6 ng/ml (95% CI 2.6 to 4.7 ng/ml) to 0.8 ng/ml (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2 ng/ml) (p < 0.01) from baseline to the 12 month follow up. The prevalence of workers reporting sensory symptoms declined from 88% (95% CI 66% to 96%) to 38% (95% CI 20% to 59%) (p < 0.01); there was no change in the overall prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms (p < 0.16). CONCLUSION: New York's smoke-free law had its intended effect of protecting hospitality workers from exposure to secondhand smoke within three months of implementation. One year after implementation, the results suggest continued compliance with the law. SN - 1468-3318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16046685/Changes_in_hospitality_workers'_exposure_to_secondhand_smoke_following_the_implementation_of_New_York's_smoke_free_law_ L2 - https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16046685 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -