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Effects of different drinks on stainability of resin composite provisional restorative materials.
J Prosthet Dent. 2005 Aug; 94(2):118-24.JP

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM

The ability of tooth-colored restorative materials for provisional restorations to resist stains is important when interim prostheses are worn for a long period. Discoloration of provisional restorative materials may result in patient dissatisfaction and additional time and expense for replacement. However, the effect of different staining agents on the color difference of resin composite restorative materials has not been completely clarified.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stainability of auto- and light-polymerized composite provisional restorative materials, reinforced microfill, and microhybrid resin composite restorative materials upon exposure to different staining agents.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Forty-five cylindrical specimens (15 x 2 mm) were prepared for each of an autopolymerized bis-acryl composite provisional restorative material (Protemp II), a light-polymerized composite provisional restorative material (Revotek LC), a reinforced microfill (Micronew), and a microhybrid composite (Filtek Z250, Herculite XRV) restorative material, using a brass mold. The specimens were wet-ground with 1000-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper for 10 seconds. The 5 restorative material specimens were divided into 9 groups (n = 5) and stored for 24 hours at 37 degrees C in different types of solutions: water, coffee, coffee with sugar, tea, tea with sugar, coffee with artificial creamer and sugar, cola, red wine, or sour cherry juice. Color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter using CIE L * a * b * relative, and color changes (DeltaE *) were then calculated. The data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (alpha = .05).

RESULTS

The interaction of provisional restorative materials and staining agents was statistically significant (P = .0001). For the 5 restorative materials tested, the lowest DeltaE * values were observed in the water, cola, and sour cherry juice groups. The highest color difference for all restorative materials was observed in the red wine groups. For microhybrid composite materials and light-polymerized composite provisional material, when tea and coffee groups with and without sugar were compared, both groups with sugar demonstrated a higher color difference than without sugar. When comparing the 5 different restorative materials, the reinforced microfill material group (Micronew) demonstrated significantly less color change than the other materials tested. The highest color difference in this study was observed for specimens in the light-polymerized composite provisional material group (Revotek LC).

CONCLUSION

The reinforced microfill restorative material tested was found significantly more color stable than the autopolymerized bis-acryl, light-polymerized composite provisional restorative materials, and microhybrid composites tested. The largest color difference was observed in the light-polymerized composite provisional material. The presence of sugar in coffee and tea increased the color difference compared to coffee or tea without sugar for light-polymerized composite provisional material and microhybrid composites.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Dentistry, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun, Turkey. auguler@omu.edu.trNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16046965

Citation

Guler, Ahmet Umut, et al. "Effects of Different Drinks On Stainability of Resin Composite Provisional Restorative Materials." The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, vol. 94, no. 2, 2005, pp. 118-24.
Guler AU, Yilmaz F, Kulunk T, et al. Effects of different drinks on stainability of resin composite provisional restorative materials. J Prosthet Dent. 2005;94(2):118-24.
Guler, A. U., Yilmaz, F., Kulunk, T., Guler, E., & Kurt, S. (2005). Effects of different drinks on stainability of resin composite provisional restorative materials. The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, 94(2), 118-24.
Guler AU, et al. Effects of Different Drinks On Stainability of Resin Composite Provisional Restorative Materials. J Prosthet Dent. 2005;94(2):118-24. PubMed PMID: 16046965.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of different drinks on stainability of resin composite provisional restorative materials. AU - Guler,Ahmet Umut, AU - Yilmaz,Fikret, AU - Kulunk,Tolga, AU - Guler,Eda, AU - Kurt,Safak, PY - 2005/7/28/pubmed PY - 2005/11/8/medline PY - 2005/7/28/entrez SP - 118 EP - 24 JF - The Journal of prosthetic dentistry JO - J Prosthet Dent VL - 94 IS - 2 N2 - STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: The ability of tooth-colored restorative materials for provisional restorations to resist stains is important when interim prostheses are worn for a long period. Discoloration of provisional restorative materials may result in patient dissatisfaction and additional time and expense for replacement. However, the effect of different staining agents on the color difference of resin composite restorative materials has not been completely clarified. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stainability of auto- and light-polymerized composite provisional restorative materials, reinforced microfill, and microhybrid resin composite restorative materials upon exposure to different staining agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five cylindrical specimens (15 x 2 mm) were prepared for each of an autopolymerized bis-acryl composite provisional restorative material (Protemp II), a light-polymerized composite provisional restorative material (Revotek LC), a reinforced microfill (Micronew), and a microhybrid composite (Filtek Z250, Herculite XRV) restorative material, using a brass mold. The specimens were wet-ground with 1000-grit silicon carbide abrasive paper for 10 seconds. The 5 restorative material specimens were divided into 9 groups (n = 5) and stored for 24 hours at 37 degrees C in different types of solutions: water, coffee, coffee with sugar, tea, tea with sugar, coffee with artificial creamer and sugar, cola, red wine, or sour cherry juice. Color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter using CIE L * a * b * relative, and color changes (DeltaE *) were then calculated. The data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (alpha = .05). RESULTS: The interaction of provisional restorative materials and staining agents was statistically significant (P = .0001). For the 5 restorative materials tested, the lowest DeltaE * values were observed in the water, cola, and sour cherry juice groups. The highest color difference for all restorative materials was observed in the red wine groups. For microhybrid composite materials and light-polymerized composite provisional material, when tea and coffee groups with and without sugar were compared, both groups with sugar demonstrated a higher color difference than without sugar. When comparing the 5 different restorative materials, the reinforced microfill material group (Micronew) demonstrated significantly less color change than the other materials tested. The highest color difference in this study was observed for specimens in the light-polymerized composite provisional material group (Revotek LC). CONCLUSION: The reinforced microfill restorative material tested was found significantly more color stable than the autopolymerized bis-acryl, light-polymerized composite provisional restorative materials, and microhybrid composites tested. The largest color difference was observed in the light-polymerized composite provisional material. The presence of sugar in coffee and tea increased the color difference compared to coffee or tea without sugar for light-polymerized composite provisional material and microhybrid composites. SN - 0022-3913 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16046965/Effects_of_different_drinks_on_stainability_of_resin_composite_provisional_restorative_materials_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022391305002544 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -