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Gender symmetry in dating intimate partner violence: does similar behavior imply similar constructs?
Violence Vict. 2005 Apr; 20(2):207-18.VV

Abstract

The present study examined the extent to which there is gender symmetry in the topography and experience of dating intimate partner violence (IPV). Self-report data were collected from 450 undergraduate men and women at a large Southeastern university. Perpetration and victimization rates were examined, as were context, function, and experience of fear. Results support the view that dating IPV is generally symmetrical at a topographical level, although significantly more women than men reported perpetration of severe physical assault. However, gender asymmetries were found in the context, function, and experience of fear. These findings suggest that gender-sensitive approaches are crucial to the understanding of dating IPV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-3013, USA. jcercone@uga.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16075667

Citation

Cercone, Jennifer J., et al. "Gender Symmetry in Dating Intimate Partner Violence: Does Similar Behavior Imply Similar Constructs?" Violence and Victims, vol. 20, no. 2, 2005, pp. 207-18.
Cercone JJ, Beach SR, Arias I. Gender symmetry in dating intimate partner violence: does similar behavior imply similar constructs? Violence Vict. 2005;20(2):207-18.
Cercone, J. J., Beach, S. R., & Arias, I. (2005). Gender symmetry in dating intimate partner violence: does similar behavior imply similar constructs? Violence and Victims, 20(2), 207-18.
Cercone JJ, Beach SR, Arias I. Gender Symmetry in Dating Intimate Partner Violence: Does Similar Behavior Imply Similar Constructs. Violence Vict. 2005;20(2):207-18. PubMed PMID: 16075667.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender symmetry in dating intimate partner violence: does similar behavior imply similar constructs? AU - Cercone,Jennifer J, AU - Beach,Steven R H, AU - Arias,Ileana, PY - 2005/8/4/pubmed PY - 2005/12/15/medline PY - 2005/8/4/entrez SP - 207 EP - 18 JF - Violence and victims JO - Violence Vict VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - The present study examined the extent to which there is gender symmetry in the topography and experience of dating intimate partner violence (IPV). Self-report data were collected from 450 undergraduate men and women at a large Southeastern university. Perpetration and victimization rates were examined, as were context, function, and experience of fear. Results support the view that dating IPV is generally symmetrical at a topographical level, although significantly more women than men reported perpetration of severe physical assault. However, gender asymmetries were found in the context, function, and experience of fear. These findings suggest that gender-sensitive approaches are crucial to the understanding of dating IPV. SN - 0886-6708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16075667/Gender_symmetry_in_dating_intimate_partner_violence:_does_similar_behavior_imply_similar_constructs DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -