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Glutamine-enriched total parenteral nutrition in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Nov; 59(11):1302-9.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suggest that supplementation of total parenteral nutrition with glutamine (gln), a conditionally essential amino acid in catabolic conditions, increases gln plasma concentrations, reduces intestinal damage, improves nitrogen balance and may improve the course of the disease. However, human data supporting this assumption are missing.

METHODS

A total of 24 consecutive patients with an acute exacerbation of IBD (19 Crohn's disease; five ulcerative colitis) and scheduled for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (>7 days) were randomised. Parallel to a standardised anti-inflammatory therapy, the patients received either a TPN with 1.5 g/kg body weight of a standard amino acid or an isonitrogenic, isocaloric TPN with 1.2 g/kg body weight of a standard amino acid and 0.3 g/kg L-alanine-L-glutamine. Primary end points were gln plasma concentrations and intestinal permeability assessed by urinary lactulose and D-xylose ratio.

RESULTS

Gln plasma levels did not differ significantly in either group throughout the study. Intestinal permeability did not change within 7 days either with or without gln supplementation (Delta-lactulose/xylose ratio: 0.01+/-0.05 (gln+) vs 0.02+/-0.1 (gln-)). The observed changes in inflammatory and nutritional parameters, and also disease activity, length of TPN and hospital stay, were independent of glutamine substitution. Five (41%) patients in the gln+ group and three (25%) patients in the gln- group needed surgical intervention.

CONCLUSION

Although limited by the sample size, these results do not support the hypothesis that glutamine substitution has an obvious biochemical or clinical benefit in patients with active IBD scheduled for total parenteral nutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Medical School of Hannover, Germany. johann.ockenga@charite.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16077744

Citation

Ockenga, J, et al. "Glutamine-enriched Total Parenteral Nutrition in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 11, 2005, pp. 1302-9.
Ockenga J, Borchert K, Stüber E, et al. Glutamine-enriched total parenteral nutrition in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(11):1302-9.
Ockenga, J., Borchert, K., Stüber, E., Lochs, H., Manns, M. P., & Bischoff, S. C. (2005). Glutamine-enriched total parenteral nutrition in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(11), 1302-9.
Ockenga J, et al. Glutamine-enriched Total Parenteral Nutrition in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005;59(11):1302-9. PubMed PMID: 16077744.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glutamine-enriched total parenteral nutrition in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AU - Ockenga,J, AU - Borchert,K, AU - Stüber,E, AU - Lochs,H, AU - Manns,M P, AU - Bischoff,S C, PY - 2005/8/4/pubmed PY - 2006/3/3/medline PY - 2005/8/4/entrez SP - 1302 EP - 9 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 59 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suggest that supplementation of total parenteral nutrition with glutamine (gln), a conditionally essential amino acid in catabolic conditions, increases gln plasma concentrations, reduces intestinal damage, improves nitrogen balance and may improve the course of the disease. However, human data supporting this assumption are missing. METHODS: A total of 24 consecutive patients with an acute exacerbation of IBD (19 Crohn's disease; five ulcerative colitis) and scheduled for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (>7 days) were randomised. Parallel to a standardised anti-inflammatory therapy, the patients received either a TPN with 1.5 g/kg body weight of a standard amino acid or an isonitrogenic, isocaloric TPN with 1.2 g/kg body weight of a standard amino acid and 0.3 g/kg L-alanine-L-glutamine. Primary end points were gln plasma concentrations and intestinal permeability assessed by urinary lactulose and D-xylose ratio. RESULTS: Gln plasma levels did not differ significantly in either group throughout the study. Intestinal permeability did not change within 7 days either with or without gln supplementation (Delta-lactulose/xylose ratio: 0.01+/-0.05 (gln+) vs 0.02+/-0.1 (gln-)). The observed changes in inflammatory and nutritional parameters, and also disease activity, length of TPN and hospital stay, were independent of glutamine substitution. Five (41%) patients in the gln+ group and three (25%) patients in the gln- group needed surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: Although limited by the sample size, these results do not support the hypothesis that glutamine substitution has an obvious biochemical or clinical benefit in patients with active IBD scheduled for total parenteral nutrition. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16077744/Glutamine_enriched_total_parenteral_nutrition_in_patients_with_inflammatory_bowel_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602243 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -