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Generalized vaccinia, progressive vaccinia, and eczema vaccinatum are rare following smallpox (vaccinia) vaccination: United States surveillance, 2003.
Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Sep 01; 41(5):689-97.CI

Abstract

Generalized vaccinia (GV), progressive vaccinia (PV), and eczema vaccinatum (EV) are adverse reactions following smallpox vaccination. We investigated all reports suggestive of GV, PV, or EV among United States civilian smallpox vaccinees during 2003 and applied standard case definitions. We identified 29 reports of possible GV among 38,440 vaccinees; 2 (7%) of the reports met the case definition. One case of GV was confirmed by identifying vaccinia from a lesion distant from the vaccine site using polymerase chain reaction. The other case was classified as probable GV, because confirmatory testing was not done. We identified 3 potential EV cases and 7 potential PV cases, none of which met the standard case definition. GV, PV, and EV were rare or absent following smallpox vaccination after careful screening of potential vaccinees. GV may be difficult to distinguish from other rashes, and confirmatory testing is recommended. Careful prevaccination screening probably contributed to the low incidence of these adverse reactions following smallpox vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. bno1@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16080092

Citation

Vellozzi, Claudia, et al. "Generalized Vaccinia, Progressive Vaccinia, and Eczema Vaccinatum Are Rare Following Smallpox (vaccinia) Vaccination: United States Surveillance, 2003." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 41, no. 5, 2005, pp. 689-97.
Vellozzi C, Lane JM, Averhoff F, et al. Generalized vaccinia, progressive vaccinia, and eczema vaccinatum are rare following smallpox (vaccinia) vaccination: United States surveillance, 2003. Clin Infect Dis. 2005;41(5):689-97.
Vellozzi, C., Lane, J. M., Averhoff, F., Maurer, T., Norton, S., Damon, I., & Casey, C. (2005). Generalized vaccinia, progressive vaccinia, and eczema vaccinatum are rare following smallpox (vaccinia) vaccination: United States surveillance, 2003. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 41(5), 689-97.
Vellozzi C, et al. Generalized Vaccinia, Progressive Vaccinia, and Eczema Vaccinatum Are Rare Following Smallpox (vaccinia) Vaccination: United States Surveillance, 2003. Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Sep 1;41(5):689-97. PubMed PMID: 16080092.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Generalized vaccinia, progressive vaccinia, and eczema vaccinatum are rare following smallpox (vaccinia) vaccination: United States surveillance, 2003. AU - Vellozzi,Claudia, AU - Lane,J Michael, AU - Averhoff,Francisco, AU - Maurer,Toby, AU - Norton,Scott, AU - Damon,Inger, AU - Casey,Christine, Y1 - 2005/07/26/ PY - 2005/04/01/received PY - 2005/05/02/accepted PY - 2005/8/5/pubmed PY - 2006/8/5/medline PY - 2005/8/5/entrez SP - 689 EP - 97 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 41 IS - 5 N2 - Generalized vaccinia (GV), progressive vaccinia (PV), and eczema vaccinatum (EV) are adverse reactions following smallpox vaccination. We investigated all reports suggestive of GV, PV, or EV among United States civilian smallpox vaccinees during 2003 and applied standard case definitions. We identified 29 reports of possible GV among 38,440 vaccinees; 2 (7%) of the reports met the case definition. One case of GV was confirmed by identifying vaccinia from a lesion distant from the vaccine site using polymerase chain reaction. The other case was classified as probable GV, because confirmatory testing was not done. We identified 3 potential EV cases and 7 potential PV cases, none of which met the standard case definition. GV, PV, and EV were rare or absent following smallpox vaccination after careful screening of potential vaccinees. GV may be difficult to distinguish from other rashes, and confirmatory testing is recommended. Careful prevaccination screening probably contributed to the low incidence of these adverse reactions following smallpox vaccination. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16080092/Generalized_vaccinia_progressive_vaccinia_and_eczema_vaccinatum_are_rare_following_smallpox__vaccinia__vaccination:_United_States_surveillance_2003_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/432584 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -