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Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh common cold studies: psychosocial predictors of susceptibility to respiratory infectious illness.

Abstract

This article provides a selected overview of 20 years of research on the role of psychosocial factors in susceptibility to upper respiratory infections. We present evidence from our laboratory that psychological stress is associated with increased risk for developing respiratory illness for persons intentionally exposed to a common cold virus, that the longer the duration of the stressor the greater the risk, and that stress association with susceptibility may be mediated by stress-induced disruption of the regulation of proinflammatory cytokines. We further provide evidence that social relationships (social integration and social support) are also associated with risk for respiratory illness: Social integration is associated with reduced risk irrespective of stress level and social support protects persons from the pathogenic influences of stress. Finally, we report recent evidence that lower levels of early childhood socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with greater risk of viral-induced illness during adulthood, independent of adult SES.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. scohen@cmu.edu

    Source

    MeSH

    Cytokines
    Humans
    Inflammation
    Interpersonal Relations
    Respiratory Tract Infections
    Risk Factors
    Social Class
    Social Support
    Stress, Psychological

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16083315

    Citation

    Cohen, Sheldon. "Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh Common Cold Studies: Psychosocial Predictors of Susceptibility to Respiratory Infectious Illness." International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 12, no. 3, 2005, pp. 123-31.
    Cohen S. Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh common cold studies: psychosocial predictors of susceptibility to respiratory infectious illness. Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(3):123-31.
    Cohen, S. (2005). Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh common cold studies: psychosocial predictors of susceptibility to respiratory infectious illness. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 12(3), pp. 123-31.
    Cohen S. Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh Common Cold Studies: Psychosocial Predictors of Susceptibility to Respiratory Infectious Illness. Int J Behav Med. 2005;12(3):123-31. PubMed PMID: 16083315.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Keynote Presentation at the Eight International Congress of Behavioral Medicine: the Pittsburgh common cold studies: psychosocial predictors of susceptibility to respiratory infectious illness. A1 - Cohen,Sheldon, PY - 2005/8/9/pubmed PY - 2005/9/21/medline PY - 2005/8/9/entrez SP - 123 EP - 31 JF - International journal of behavioral medicine JO - Int J Behav Med VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - This article provides a selected overview of 20 years of research on the role of psychosocial factors in susceptibility to upper respiratory infections. We present evidence from our laboratory that psychological stress is associated with increased risk for developing respiratory illness for persons intentionally exposed to a common cold virus, that the longer the duration of the stressor the greater the risk, and that stress association with susceptibility may be mediated by stress-induced disruption of the regulation of proinflammatory cytokines. We further provide evidence that social relationships (social integration and social support) are also associated with risk for respiratory illness: Social integration is associated with reduced risk irrespective of stress level and social support protects persons from the pathogenic influences of stress. Finally, we report recent evidence that lower levels of early childhood socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with greater risk of viral-induced illness during adulthood, independent of adult SES. SN - 1070-5503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16083315/full_citation L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=16083315.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -