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A 2-year follow-up study of alcohol consumption and risk of dementia.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2006; 108(4):378-83CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This report focused on investigating the relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia in elderly people through prospective studies.

METHODS

We conducted a 2-year follow-up study of elderly people from six communities in Chongqing, China. Dementia was detected using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III-R). The relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia was investigated using multiple logistic regression models, adjusting for the potential confounders age, sex, educational level and cigarette smoking.

RESULTS

Light-to-moderate drinking was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia compared with non-drinking. Excessive drinking was related to a higher risk of dementia. The effect of light-to-moderate drinking seemed most prominent among vascular dementia, 0.63 (0.55-0.72) for Alzheimer's disease, 0.31 (0.19-0.51) for vascular dementia and 0.45 (0.12-1.69) for other dementia. In a model adjusting for confounding variables, a light-to-moderate intake of beer was associated with a significantly higher risk of dementia than a non-drinker of beer. For wine, a significantly lower risk of dementia existed for a light-to-moderate drinker.

CONCLUSIONS

Light-to-moderate drinking was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia compared with a non-drinker.

Authors+Show Affiliations

2nd Department of Neurology, Research Institute of Surgery and Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16084641

Citation

Deng, Juan, et al. "A 2-year Follow-up Study of Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Dementia." Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, vol. 108, no. 4, 2006, pp. 378-83.
Deng J, Zhou DH, Li J, et al. A 2-year follow-up study of alcohol consumption and risk of dementia. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2006;108(4):378-83.
Deng, J., Zhou, D. H., Li, J., Wang, Y. J., Gao, C., & Chen, M. (2006). A 2-year follow-up study of alcohol consumption and risk of dementia. Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, 108(4), pp. 378-83.
Deng J, et al. A 2-year Follow-up Study of Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Dementia. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2006;108(4):378-83. PubMed PMID: 16084641.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A 2-year follow-up study of alcohol consumption and risk of dementia. AU - Deng,Juan, AU - Zhou,David H D, AU - Li,Jingcheng, AU - Wang,Y John, AU - Gao,Changyue, AU - Chen,Man'e, Y1 - 2005/08/09/ PY - 2004/08/10/received PY - 2005/06/13/revised PY - 2005/06/13/accepted PY - 2005/8/9/pubmed PY - 2006/8/12/medline PY - 2005/8/9/entrez SP - 378 EP - 83 JF - Clinical neurology and neurosurgery JO - Clin Neurol Neurosurg VL - 108 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: This report focused on investigating the relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia in elderly people through prospective studies. METHODS: We conducted a 2-year follow-up study of elderly people from six communities in Chongqing, China. Dementia was detected using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III-R). The relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia was investigated using multiple logistic regression models, adjusting for the potential confounders age, sex, educational level and cigarette smoking. RESULTS: Light-to-moderate drinking was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia compared with non-drinking. Excessive drinking was related to a higher risk of dementia. The effect of light-to-moderate drinking seemed most prominent among vascular dementia, 0.63 (0.55-0.72) for Alzheimer's disease, 0.31 (0.19-0.51) for vascular dementia and 0.45 (0.12-1.69) for other dementia. In a model adjusting for confounding variables, a light-to-moderate intake of beer was associated with a significantly higher risk of dementia than a non-drinker of beer. For wine, a significantly lower risk of dementia existed for a light-to-moderate drinker. CONCLUSIONS: Light-to-moderate drinking was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia compared with a non-drinker. SN - 0303-8467 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16084641/A_2_year_follow_up_study_of_alcohol_consumption_and_risk_of_dementia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0303-8467(05)00109-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -