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Associations between black tea and coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer among current and former smokers.
Nutr Cancer 2005; 52(1):15-21NC

Abstract

Although cigarette smoking is a clear risk factor for lung cancer, the other determinants of lung cancer risk among smokers are less clear. Tea and coffee contain catechins and flavonoids, which have been shown to exhibit anticarcinogenic properties. Conversely, caffeine may elevate cancer risk through a variety of mechanisms. The current study investigated the effects of regular consumption of black tea and coffee on lung cancer risk among 993 current and former smokers with primary incident lung cancer and 986 age-, sex-, and smoking-matched hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions. Results indicated that lung cancer risk was not different for those with the highest black tea consumption (>or=2 cups/day) compared with nondrinkers of tea [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.66-1.24]. However, elevated lung cancer risk was observed for participants who consumed 2-3 cups of regular coffee daily (aOR=1.34; 95% CI=0.99-1.82) or >or=4 cups of regular coffee daily (aOR=1.51, 95% CI=1.11-2.05). In contrast, decaffeinated coffee drinking was associated with decreased lung cancer risk for both participants who consumed <or=1 cup/day (aOR=0.67; 95% CI=0.54-0.84) and those who consumed >or=2 cups/day (aOR=0.64; 95% CI=0.51-0.80). These results suggest that any chemoprotective effects of phytochemicals in coffee and tea may be overshadowed by the elevated risk associated with caffeine in these beverages.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16090999

Citation

Baker, Julie A., et al. "Associations Between Black Tea and Coffee Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer Among Current and Former Smokers." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 52, no. 1, 2005, pp. 15-21.
Baker JA, McCann SE, Reid ME, et al. Associations between black tea and coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer among current and former smokers. Nutr Cancer. 2005;52(1):15-21.
Baker, J. A., McCann, S. E., Reid, M. E., Nowell, S., Beehler, G. P., & Moysich, K. B. (2005). Associations between black tea and coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer among current and former smokers. Nutrition and Cancer, 52(1), pp. 15-21.
Baker JA, et al. Associations Between Black Tea and Coffee Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer Among Current and Former Smokers. Nutr Cancer. 2005;52(1):15-21. PubMed PMID: 16090999.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between black tea and coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer among current and former smokers. AU - Baker,Julie A, AU - McCann,Susan E, AU - Reid,Mary E, AU - Nowell,Susan, AU - Beehler,Gregory P, AU - Moysich,Kirsten B, PY - 2005/8/11/pubmed PY - 2006/3/7/medline PY - 2005/8/11/entrez SP - 15 EP - 21 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 52 IS - 1 N2 - Although cigarette smoking is a clear risk factor for lung cancer, the other determinants of lung cancer risk among smokers are less clear. Tea and coffee contain catechins and flavonoids, which have been shown to exhibit anticarcinogenic properties. Conversely, caffeine may elevate cancer risk through a variety of mechanisms. The current study investigated the effects of regular consumption of black tea and coffee on lung cancer risk among 993 current and former smokers with primary incident lung cancer and 986 age-, sex-, and smoking-matched hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions. Results indicated that lung cancer risk was not different for those with the highest black tea consumption (>or=2 cups/day) compared with nondrinkers of tea [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.66-1.24]. However, elevated lung cancer risk was observed for participants who consumed 2-3 cups of regular coffee daily (aOR=1.34; 95% CI=0.99-1.82) or >or=4 cups of regular coffee daily (aOR=1.51, 95% CI=1.11-2.05). In contrast, decaffeinated coffee drinking was associated with decreased lung cancer risk for both participants who consumed <or=1 cup/day (aOR=0.67; 95% CI=0.54-0.84) and those who consumed >or=2 cups/day (aOR=0.64; 95% CI=0.51-0.80). These results suggest that any chemoprotective effects of phytochemicals in coffee and tea may be overshadowed by the elevated risk associated with caffeine in these beverages. SN - 0163-5581 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16090999/Associations_between_black_tea_and_coffee_consumption_and_risk_of_lung_cancer_among_current_and_former_smokers_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1207/s15327914nc5201_2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -