Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Respiratory outcomes among South African coal miners at autopsy.
Am J Ind Med 2005; 48(3):217-24AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies of dose-response relationships between respiratory outcomes at autopsy and coal dust exposure are limited. The Pathology Automation System (PATHAUT) database of South African miners, is one of the largest autopsy databases of occupational lung disease. This study described the prevalence of respiratory outcomes among South African coal miners at autopsy, and determined whether dose response relationships existed between emphysema and exposure.

METHODS

Autopsies conducted from 1975 to 1997 on coal miners with exclusive coal mining exposure and having exposure duration information (n = 3,167) were analyzed from PATHAUT. Logistic regression was used to determine relationships between exposure and outcomes, controlling for race, smoking and age on a subset for whom smoking history was available (n = 725).

RESULTS

The mean duration of exposure was 11.0 years. Most were black miners (75.3%) with significant differences in the mean ages of black and white miners (37.9 and 55.3 years, respectively). Only 22.9% of cases had information on smoking. The prevalence of silicosis, tuberculosis (TB), coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), and moderate and marked emphysema were 10.7%, 5.2%, 7.3%, and 6.4%, respectively. All diseases, except TB, were associated with exposure duration. Black miners had 8.3 and 1.2 fold greater risks for TB and CWP, respectively, than white miners. White miners had an increased risk of 1.4 and 5.4 for silicosis and moderate to marked emphysema, respectively. In models unadjusted for age, and including smoking, moderate to marked emphysema was strongly associated with exposure duration (OR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.9-5.9 for highest tercile of exposure duration). Exposure-related risk estimates were reduced when age was introduced into the model. However, age and duration of exposure were highly correlated, (r = 0.68) suggesting a dilution of the exposure effect by age.

CONCLUSIONS

There were significant dose related associations of disease, including emphysema, with coal dust exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health/Department of Community Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. naidoon@ukzn.ac.zaNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16094611

Citation

Naidoo, Rajen N., et al. "Respiratory Outcomes Among South African Coal Miners at Autopsy." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 48, no. 3, 2005, pp. 217-24.
Naidoo RN, Robins TG, Murray J. Respiratory outcomes among South African coal miners at autopsy. Am J Ind Med. 2005;48(3):217-24.
Naidoo, R. N., Robins, T. G., & Murray, J. (2005). Respiratory outcomes among South African coal miners at autopsy. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 48(3), pp. 217-24.
Naidoo RN, Robins TG, Murray J. Respiratory Outcomes Among South African Coal Miners at Autopsy. Am J Ind Med. 2005;48(3):217-24. PubMed PMID: 16094611.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respiratory outcomes among South African coal miners at autopsy. AU - Naidoo,Rajen N, AU - Robins,Thomas G, AU - Murray,Jill, PY - 2005/8/12/pubmed PY - 2005/12/15/medline PY - 2005/8/12/entrez SP - 217 EP - 24 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am. J. Ind. Med. VL - 48 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies of dose-response relationships between respiratory outcomes at autopsy and coal dust exposure are limited. The Pathology Automation System (PATHAUT) database of South African miners, is one of the largest autopsy databases of occupational lung disease. This study described the prevalence of respiratory outcomes among South African coal miners at autopsy, and determined whether dose response relationships existed between emphysema and exposure. METHODS: Autopsies conducted from 1975 to 1997 on coal miners with exclusive coal mining exposure and having exposure duration information (n = 3,167) were analyzed from PATHAUT. Logistic regression was used to determine relationships between exposure and outcomes, controlling for race, smoking and age on a subset for whom smoking history was available (n = 725). RESULTS: The mean duration of exposure was 11.0 years. Most were black miners (75.3%) with significant differences in the mean ages of black and white miners (37.9 and 55.3 years, respectively). Only 22.9% of cases had information on smoking. The prevalence of silicosis, tuberculosis (TB), coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP), and moderate and marked emphysema were 10.7%, 5.2%, 7.3%, and 6.4%, respectively. All diseases, except TB, were associated with exposure duration. Black miners had 8.3 and 1.2 fold greater risks for TB and CWP, respectively, than white miners. White miners had an increased risk of 1.4 and 5.4 for silicosis and moderate to marked emphysema, respectively. In models unadjusted for age, and including smoking, moderate to marked emphysema was strongly associated with exposure duration (OR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.9-5.9 for highest tercile of exposure duration). Exposure-related risk estimates were reduced when age was introduced into the model. However, age and duration of exposure were highly correlated, (r = 0.68) suggesting a dilution of the exposure effect by age. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant dose related associations of disease, including emphysema, with coal dust exposure. SN - 0271-3586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16094611/Respiratory_outcomes_among_South_African_coal_miners_at_autopsy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.20207 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -