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Schizophrenia and single-carbon metabolism.

Abstract

Schizophrenic patients generally appear to have a disturbed single-carbon metabolism. Methionine and homocysteine are intermediary metabolites in this metabolic system. In a case-control study of the cerebrospinal fluid, a majority of the patients had elevated methionine and a smaller subgroup had elevated homocysteine. Elevated homocysteine is often explained by folate dependency due to mutations in the gene for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). A most encouraging feature of single-carbon metabolism is its potential modification by natural means, such as B-vitamins and antioxidants. The findings point to a new area of schizophrenia research: the role of nutrients and antioxidants for rational prevention and treatment.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Göteborg University, Sweden. bjorn.regland@vgregion.se

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Antioxidants
    Blood-Brain Barrier
    Carbon
    Case-Control Studies
    Homocystine
    Humans
    Methionine
    Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)
    Models, Biological
    Schizophrenia
    Vitamin B 12

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16095790

    Citation

    Regland, Björn. "Schizophrenia and Single-carbon Metabolism." Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, vol. 29, no. 7, 2005, pp. 1124-32.
    Regland B. Schizophrenia and single-carbon metabolism. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005;29(7):1124-32.
    Regland, B. (2005). Schizophrenia and single-carbon metabolism. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 29(7), pp. 1124-32.
    Regland B. Schizophrenia and Single-carbon Metabolism. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2005;29(7):1124-32. PubMed PMID: 16095790.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Schizophrenia and single-carbon metabolism. A1 - Regland,Björn, PY - 2005/06/17/accepted PY - 2005/8/13/pubmed PY - 2006/1/18/medline PY - 2005/8/13/entrez SP - 1124 EP - 32 JF - Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry JO - Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry VL - 29 IS - 7 N2 - Schizophrenic patients generally appear to have a disturbed single-carbon metabolism. Methionine and homocysteine are intermediary metabolites in this metabolic system. In a case-control study of the cerebrospinal fluid, a majority of the patients had elevated methionine and a smaller subgroup had elevated homocysteine. Elevated homocysteine is often explained by folate dependency due to mutations in the gene for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). A most encouraging feature of single-carbon metabolism is its potential modification by natural means, such as B-vitamins and antioxidants. The findings point to a new area of schizophrenia research: the role of nutrients and antioxidants for rational prevention and treatment. SN - 0278-5846 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16095790/Schizophrenia_and_single_carbon_metabolism_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-5846(05)00219-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -