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Exposure-response relationships for coal mine dust and obstructive lung disease following enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969.

Abstract

Underground U.S. coal miners were studied cross-sectionally for the association of respirable coal mine dust exposure with pulmonary function and symptoms of airways obstruction. The study group included 1,185 miners participating in Round 4 of the National Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis who had started mining in or after 1970 when comprehensive exposure regulations first came into effect. Quantitative estimates of cumulative exposure, derived using respirable dust measurements taken by the Mine Safety and Health Administration over the entire study period, were used in linear and logistic regression models on indicators of pulmonary function and chest symptoms while controlling for smoking status, pack-years, and other potential confounders. Statistically significant associations between log cumulative exposure and decrements in FVC, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were observed. In logistic models, statistically significant associations of cumulative exposure with increasing prevalence of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC less than 80% predicted and symptoms including chronic phlegm, chronic bronchitis, breathlessness, wheeze, and wheeze with shortness of breath were found. It is concluded that exposures to respirable coal mine dust present in U.S. mines since 1970 continue to affect respiratory health in underground miners.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-2029.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Bronchitis
    Coal
    Cohort Studies
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dust
    Humans
    Lung Diseases, Obstructive
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Mining
    Occupational Exposure
    Regression Analysis
    Smoking
    United States
    Vital Capacity

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    1609817

    Citation

    Seixas, N S., et al. "Exposure-response Relationships for Coal Mine Dust and Obstructive Lung Disease Following Enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 21, no. 5, 1992, pp. 715-34.
    Seixas NS, Robins TG, Attfield MD, et al. Exposure-response relationships for coal mine dust and obstructive lung disease following enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. Am J Ind Med. 1992;21(5):715-34.
    Seixas, N. S., Robins, T. G., Attfield, M. D., & Moulton, L. H. (1992). Exposure-response relationships for coal mine dust and obstructive lung disease following enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 21(5), pp. 715-34.
    Seixas NS, et al. Exposure-response Relationships for Coal Mine Dust and Obstructive Lung Disease Following Enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. Am J Ind Med. 1992;21(5):715-34. PubMed PMID: 1609817.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure-response relationships for coal mine dust and obstructive lung disease following enactment of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. AU - Seixas,N S, AU - Robins,T G, AU - Attfield,M D, AU - Moulton,L H, PY - 1992/1/1/pubmed PY - 1992/1/1/medline PY - 1992/1/1/entrez SP - 715 EP - 34 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am. J. Ind. Med. VL - 21 IS - 5 N2 - Underground U.S. coal miners were studied cross-sectionally for the association of respirable coal mine dust exposure with pulmonary function and symptoms of airways obstruction. The study group included 1,185 miners participating in Round 4 of the National Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis who had started mining in or after 1970 when comprehensive exposure regulations first came into effect. Quantitative estimates of cumulative exposure, derived using respirable dust measurements taken by the Mine Safety and Health Administration over the entire study period, were used in linear and logistic regression models on indicators of pulmonary function and chest symptoms while controlling for smoking status, pack-years, and other potential confounders. Statistically significant associations between log cumulative exposure and decrements in FVC, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were observed. In logistic models, statistically significant associations of cumulative exposure with increasing prevalence of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC less than 80% predicted and symptoms including chronic phlegm, chronic bronchitis, breathlessness, wheeze, and wheeze with shortness of breath were found. It is concluded that exposures to respirable coal mine dust present in U.S. mines since 1970 continue to affect respiratory health in underground miners. SN - 0271-3586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1609817/Exposure_response_relationships_for_coal_mine_dust_and_obstructive_lung_disease_following_enactment_of_the_Federal_Coal_Mine_Health_and_Safety_Act_of_1969_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0271-3586&date=1992&volume=21&issue=5&spage=715 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -