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Passive cigarette smoke exposure in primary school children in Liverpool.
Public Health. 2006 Jan; 120(1):65-9.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure amongst primary school children.

METHODS

A descriptive, community-based, cross-sectional study of self-reported parental smoking patterns and children's salivary cotinine concentrations in 245 children aged 5-11 years attending 10 primary schools in Liverpool.

RESULTS

The mean age was 7.4 years. The percentage of children living in smoking households was higher than the average reported for England (61.4% vs 53.0%). The average daily number of cigarettes smoked was similar for fathers (15.8) and mothers (16.4). The mean salivary cotinine concentration (+/-SD) was 1.6+/-0.4 ng/ml, and was higher in boys than girls (1.9+/-0.4 vs 1.2+/-0.2 ng/ml, P=0.006). The mean cotinine concentration was higher amongst children less than 7 years of age compared with older children (1.9+/-0.9 vs 1.4+/-0.6 ng/ml, P=0.01). Children from disadvantaged socio-economic households (Townsend score > + 6) had a mean cotinine level of 1.9+/-0.4 ng/ml, and a higher risk of a positive cotinine-validated level (>or=1 ng/ml) [crude odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-5.2). Maternal, but not paternal, cigarette smoke exposure was significantly associated with the salivary cotinine-validated level in children (adjusted OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.8-3.4).

CONCLUSIONS

Maternal smoking, age less than 7 years, child's gender (male) and low socio-economic status were significant risk factors associated with ETS exposure in young school children in Liverpool. The level of childhood ETS exposure in this area demonstrates a major public health concern that creates a challenge for innovative interactive strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Child and Reproductive Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, L3 5QA Liverpool, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16099002

Citation

Delpisheh, A, et al. "Passive Cigarette Smoke Exposure in Primary School Children in Liverpool." Public Health, vol. 120, no. 1, 2006, pp. 65-9.
Delpisheh A, Kelly Y, Brabin BJ. Passive cigarette smoke exposure in primary school children in Liverpool. Public Health. 2006;120(1):65-9.
Delpisheh, A., Kelly, Y., & Brabin, B. J. (2006). Passive cigarette smoke exposure in primary school children in Liverpool. Public Health, 120(1), 65-9.
Delpisheh A, Kelly Y, Brabin BJ. Passive Cigarette Smoke Exposure in Primary School Children in Liverpool. Public Health. 2006;120(1):65-9. PubMed PMID: 16099002.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Passive cigarette smoke exposure in primary school children in Liverpool. AU - Delpisheh,A, AU - Kelly,Y, AU - Brabin,B J, Y1 - 2005/08/15/ PY - 2004/11/25/received PY - 2005/03/02/revised PY - 2005/05/12/accepted PY - 2005/8/16/pubmed PY - 2006/1/27/medline PY - 2005/8/16/entrez SP - 65 EP - 9 JF - Public health JO - Public Health VL - 120 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure amongst primary school children. METHODS: A descriptive, community-based, cross-sectional study of self-reported parental smoking patterns and children's salivary cotinine concentrations in 245 children aged 5-11 years attending 10 primary schools in Liverpool. RESULTS: The mean age was 7.4 years. The percentage of children living in smoking households was higher than the average reported for England (61.4% vs 53.0%). The average daily number of cigarettes smoked was similar for fathers (15.8) and mothers (16.4). The mean salivary cotinine concentration (+/-SD) was 1.6+/-0.4 ng/ml, and was higher in boys than girls (1.9+/-0.4 vs 1.2+/-0.2 ng/ml, P=0.006). The mean cotinine concentration was higher amongst children less than 7 years of age compared with older children (1.9+/-0.9 vs 1.4+/-0.6 ng/ml, P=0.01). Children from disadvantaged socio-economic households (Townsend score > + 6) had a mean cotinine level of 1.9+/-0.4 ng/ml, and a higher risk of a positive cotinine-validated level (>or=1 ng/ml) [crude odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-5.2). Maternal, but not paternal, cigarette smoke exposure was significantly associated with the salivary cotinine-validated level in children (adjusted OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.8-3.4). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal smoking, age less than 7 years, child's gender (male) and low socio-economic status were significant risk factors associated with ETS exposure in young school children in Liverpool. The level of childhood ETS exposure in this area demonstrates a major public health concern that creates a challenge for innovative interactive strategies. SN - 0033-3506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16099002/Passive_cigarette_smoke_exposure_in_primary_school_children_in_Liverpool_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0033-3506(05)00151-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -